Home > Amibian.js, C/C++, Delphi, JavaScript, nodeJS, Object Pascal > Quartex Web OS: A cloud OS in takes form

Quartex Web OS: A cloud OS in takes form

January 19, 2019 Leave a comment Go to comments

It’s been a while since I’ve posted now. I have 3 articles in escrow, and every time I think I will finish them, I end up writing more. But yes, more Delphi articles is coming and I have lined up both components and rich code that everyone will be happy about.

Please look before shooting

Before we dig into the new stuff, I want to clear up a misconception. We programmers often forget that not everyone knows what we do, and we take it for granted that everyone will instantly understand something we talk about. Which is rarely the case.

I have noticed that quite a few have misjudged the project radically, thinking that the first version (cloud ripper) is just a toy, a mock desktop or even worse: just a remake of a legacy system that “has no role in modern computing”.

It is true that I have taken more than a little from Amiga OS in terms of architecture, but I have exclusively taken ideas that are good and works well under the ASYNC execution model. I have also replicated the way the filesystem is organized, things like REXX (which was added to OS X in 2015), the menu system – these are indeed built on how Amiga OS did things. The same can be said about library functions. Not because they are old, but because they make sense. Many of the functions appear in other systems too, like GTK on Linux and WinAPI for Windows. There are only so many ways to open a window, change the title, define scrollbars and execute processes.

kiosk-systems

Kiosk systems like this are great targets for the Quartex Web OS

While there are clear architectural aspects taken from older systems, doesn’t mean that the system itself is old in any way. This system is designed to run as WebAssembly, ASM.js and vanilla Javascript – which is ASYNC by nature. It is designed to run and share payload over several machines, not a single outdated CPU and chipset. You have swarm based task solving – which is quite cutting edge if I might say so. None of these things were invented back in the day.

Some have also asked why this is even needed. Well, let me give you a simple use case.

One of my customers is doing work for Jensen, a Danish producer of IT hardware. They make mostly routers, wifi usb dongles and similar devices. But like many hardware vendors their web interface leaves a lot to be desires. Router web interfaces are usually quite annoying and poorly written. Something that should have taken 5 minutes can end up taking 30 just because the design of the interface is rubbish.

With my solution these vendors will be able to drop a whole infrastructure into their products; a infrastructure that provides all the things they need to quickly build a great control panel and router interface. Things like file system mapping, being able to store data to the filesystem through an established websocket protocol; all of it wrapped up in a simple but powerful API. Their settings and features can be represented as programs, which run in windows that are intuitively styled and easy to understand. They will also cut development time dramatically by calling the Quartex Soft-Kernel, rather than having to re-invent everything from scratch.

That is just a tiny, tiny use-case where the desktop and services makes perfect sense. But also keep in mind that the same system can scale up to a 1000 instance Amazon supercomputer if you need to, providing software for your offices and development teams.

In 8 months the desktop is complete (probably before) and I start building the first purely web powered software development toolchain. Everything has been transformed into Javascript (as in compilers, linkers – the whole lot). Both freepascal, clang c/c++ and much more. And developers will be able to login and start producing applications out of the box. The fact that the entire system is chipset and platform independent is quite unique. People tend to use native code behind a facade of html5. Not here. Here you have over 4000 classes, 800.000 lines of code just for the desktop client, looking back at you.

Hopefully this has shed some lights on the project, and people will stop looking at this as “old junk”. As a person who loves older computers, Amiga especially, I am quite frankly astounded by the ignorance regarding that platform. A juiced up 30 year old Amiga will give any modern computer a run for it’s money when it comes to ease of use, quality software and pure productivity. 10 years before Windows even existed, europeans enjoyed a colorful, window based desktop with full multitasking. When we had to switch to PC it was like going back to the 1500’s in terms of functionality – and it wasnt until Windows 7 that Microsoft caught up with Commodore. So if I have managed to get over even 1% of the spirit in that machine – then I will be very happy indeed.

But to limit a clustered, 40 CPU core architecture using modern, off-the-shelves parts, a multitude of node services to “old junk” is nothing short of an intellectual emergency. Please read, digest and look more closely before passing judgement.

Right then, so what’s new?

48365835_10155890849180906_6431235229611982848_n

The Quartex “Cloud Ripper”

Where to begin! Like mentioned in my previous post Amibian.js is a cluster system. As such the project now has its first real hardware sorted! I have gone for a 5 x ODroid XU4 model, neatly tucked inside a PICO 5H case. The budget was set at USD 400, but with shipping and taxes it ended up costing around USD 600. But that is not a bad price for the firepower you get (40 CPU cores, 20 GPU cores and 16 Gb Ram), the ODroid is a powerful, stable and reliable ARM SBC (single board computer). In benchmarks the Raspberry PI 3b scored 830 Dhrystones, the ODroid scored 5500 Dhrystones. And my architecture use five of them, so this is a $600 super-computer built using off the shelves part.

The back-end server has had several bugs fixed, especially the problems with path’s and databases. You can now edit the settings.ini file and tell the system where the database should be created or accessed from, you can set the port for the server, if it should use SSL + Secure WebSocket,  or ordinary HTTP + Websocket.

50511885_10155952491120906_1059229155276619776_o

40 ARM CPU cores, that is a lot of firepower for USD 200 !

I am also ditching the TW3NodeFileSystem driver for server logic and using ordinary node.js calls there. The TW3NodeFileSystem driver is mounted as you perform a login – and it acts as a sandbox, mounting your folder as a device (and making sure you can’t ever touch files outside your “home” server folder). We still need to implement a proper UNIX directory parser, but that is easy enough.

Quartex Pascal

Yes, I have picked up Quartex Pascal again, which originally started in 2014. I have started writing a new RTL for DWScript which is an alternative to Smart Mobile Studio. It is different from the Smart RTL and is closer to FMX than VCL.

Eventually the Quartex Web OS and all its services will compile without code from Smart Mobile Studio.

Hosted applications, messages and our soft-kernel

The biggest news, which is also the most tricky to get right, is getting hosted applications (applications are hosted in IFrame containers) to communicate with the desktop. As you probably know browsers have rigid security measures, and the rules for threads (web workers) and separate processes (frames) are severe to say the least.

50407351_795409364151096_4870092648481816576_n

The LDEF assembler is the first application to grace the system

A secondary application hosted in a frame has absolutely no access to the rest of the DOM. Meaning that the code has no way of calling functions or manipulating elements outside its own DOM in the frame container. This is a good system because we don’t want rouge applications causing havoc.

The only way an application can talk to the desktop is through messages. And while this sounds easy, remember: we are doing this as a solid system, not just slapping something together.

  • After loading a hosted application, the desktop will send a handshake request. It will do this on interval until the application accepts.
  • When the application replies with a handshake message, the desktop sends a special message-channel object to the app. All communication with the desktop must happen on that secure channel.
  • With the channel obtained, the application has to provide the application manifest file. This is a special INI-File containing information about the program, including access rights. None of the soft-kernel API functions will execute until a valid manifest-file has been delivered.
  • Once the manifest has been sent and accepted, the hosted application is free to call the soft-kernel functions.

The above might sound simple but it includes several sub technologies to be in place first:

  • Call Stack: a class that keep track of sent messages and a callback. When a response arrives it will execute the correct callback to deliver the response. This is a kind of “promises” engine for message delivery.
  • Message factory, matches message-data to the correct message class, creates the instance and de-serialize the data automatically for you
  • Message dispatcher: Allows you to register a message with a handler procedure. When a message arrives the dispatcher calls the message-factory, then calls the correct handler.
  • Base64 Encoding on byte-array, stream and buffer level (does not exist in either node.js or JavaScript in general)
  • String to UTF8 Byte-Array encoding
  • UTF8 Byte-Array to String encoding
  • escape and unescape for byte-array, stream and buffer
  • URI-encoder for byte-array, stream and buffer

But that was just the beginning, I also had to introduce an object that I have been dreading to even start on, namely the “process” class. The process is not just a simple reference to the frame container, it has to keep track of the websocket endpoint, application manifest, error handling, message routing and much more.

50077678_10155951521540906_6068161951656050688_o

CLANG compiled to webassembly, meaning we can now compile proper C/C++ in the browser

Since Amibian.js supports not just JavaScript, but also bytecode applications – the process object also contains the LDEF runtime engine; not to mention all the system resources a process can own.

The cool part is that things work exactly like I planned! There is plenty of room to optimize, but all in all the architecture is sound. And it was quite a hallelujah moment when the first API call went through at 00:00 19.01.2019! A call to SetWindowTitle() where the hosted application set the caption of its main-window purely via code. Cross domain communication at it’s very best.

The LDEF Assembler

Yes LDEF Bytecodes are fantastic, and the first program I have made is a traditional assembler. I went all in and implemented a full text-editor to get better control, and also to get rid of the ACE code editor, which was a massive dependency. So glad we got rid of that.

So now you can write assembly code, assemble it, run it, dis-assemble it and even dump the bytecodes to the window. You will be able to save the bytecodes to disk by the end of this weekend, and then run the bytecode programs from shell or the desktop. So we are really making progress here.

49938355_1169526123220996_502291013608407040_o

A good shell / pipe infrastructure is the key to a powerful desktop

LDEF is the bytecode system that will be used to build high-level languages like Basic and Pascal. Since Freepascal is now able to compile itself to JavaScript I will naturally add that to the IDE next fall; the same is true for CLANG which has compiled itself to WebAssembly — and who generates webassembly.

So C/C++ and object pascal are already working and waiting for the IDE.

LDEF is a grander system though, because libraries can be loaded by Delphi, C++ builder, C# or whatever you fancy – and used. It can be post-processed to real machine code, or converted to pure WebAssembly. It holds much wider scope than stack machines like CLR and Java, and its more natural for assembly programmers – because it’s based on real CPU’s. It’s a register based virtual machine, not a stack-machine.

More?

Tons, but you have to visit my patreon page to keep track. I try to publish as much as possible there rather than here. I post a bit on both, but the proper channel for Amibian.js (or “Quartex Web OS” as its official name is) will always be Patreon.

50108015_314551789176307_8213345524409958400_n

The picture viewer now has momentum scrolling in full-mode.

Also, fixed more bugs in the Smart RTL than I can count, and re-made window movement. Window movement now uses the GPU, so they are silky smooth everywhere. Resize will be optimized next, then you can’t really tell it’s not native code at all.

Delphi Component updates

Yes Delphi is also a huge part of the Patreon project, and you will be happy to hear that the form designer (which shares a codebase with the graphics application components) have seen more work!

You can check out some of the changes to the form-designer here:

These changes will be in the january update (end of month) together with all the changes to Amibian.js, HexLicense, Tween library and all the rest 🙂

Cheers!

  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: