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Mirroring groups on the MeWe network

November 18, 2018 1 comment

Following my Administrator woes on Facebook post I have had a look at alternative places to run a forum. I realized that Facebook is getting pretty intrinsic in society around the world, so I know everyone won’t be interested in a new venue. But honestly, MeWe is very simple to use and have an UI experience very close to the Facebook app.

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This picture was flagged as “hateful” on Facebook, which has rendered my account frozen for the next 30 days. While I agree to the strict rules that FB advocates, they really must deploy more human beings if they intend to have success in this endeavour. And that means really investigating what is flagged, reading threads in all languages etc. Because the risk of flagging the wrong guy is just too high. Admins get flagged all the time for kicking out bullies, and the use of reporting tools as a revenge strategy *must* carry a penalty.

MeWe is thankfully not like G+ which (in my personal opinion) was counter-intuitive and damn right intrusive. We all remember the G+ auto-upload feature, where some 3 million users had their family photos, vacation photos and .. ehrm, “explicitly personal” photos uploaded without consent.

Well, the MeWe app is very simple, and registration is as easy as it should be. You make a user name, a password, and type in your email; then you verify your email and that’s it!

Besides, my main use for Facebook or MeWe is to run the groups – I spend very little of my time socializing anyways. With the amount of groups and media i push on a daily basis it’s quite frankly their loss.

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The MeWe group functionality is very good, and almost identical to Facebook

The alternative to MeWe is to setup a proper web forum instead. I have bought 6 domains that are now collecting dust so yes, I will look into that – but the whole purpose of a social platform is that you don’t have to do maintenance beyond daily management – so MeWe saves us some time.

So head over to MeWe and register! Here are the two main groups I manage these days. The main groups are on facebook, but i have now registered the same groups on MeWe.

MeWe doesn’t cost anything and takes less than 5 minutes to join. Just like G+ and Facebook, MeWe can be installed as an app for your phone (both iOS and Android). So as far as alternatives go, it’s a good alternative. One more app wont do much harm I imagine.

Note: I will naturally keep my Facebook account for the sake of the groups, but having experienced this 4 times in 9 years, my tolerance of Mr. Suckerberg is quickly reaching its limits. If I have blurted something out I have no problems standing for that and taking the penalty, but posting a picture of software development? In a group dedicated to software development? That takes some impressive mental acrobatics to accept.

Smart Mobile Studio presentation in Oslo

September 28, 2018 Leave a comment

Yesterday evening I traveled to Oslo and held a presentation on Smart Mobile Studio. The response was very positive and I hope that everyone who attended left with some new ideas regarding JavaScript, the direction the world of software is heading – and how Smart Mobile Studio can be of service to Delphi.

Smart Pascal is especially exciting in concert with Rad-Server, where it opens the doors to Node based, platform independent services and sub clustering. With relatively little effort Rad-Server can absorb the wealth that node has to offer through Smart – but on your terms, and under Delphi’s control. The best of both worlds.

You get the stability and structure that makes Delphi so productive, and then infuse that with the flamboyance, flair and async brilliance that JavaScript represents.

More important than technology is the community! It’s been a few years since I took part in the Oslo Delphi Club’s meetups, so it was great to chat with Halvard Vassbotten, Trond Grøntoft, Alf Christoffersen, Torgeir Amundsen and Robin Bakker face to face again. I also had the pleasure of meeting some new Delphi developers.

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Presentation at ABG Sundal Collier’s offices in Oslo

Thankfully the number of attendees were a moderate 14, considering this was my first presentation ever. Last time I visited was when our late Paweł Głowacki presented FMX, and the turnout was in the ballpark of a hundred. So it was an easy-going, laid-back atmosphere throughout the evening.

Conflict of interest?

Some might wonder why a person working for Embarcadero will present Smart Mobile Studio, which some still regard as competition. Smart is not in competition with Delphi and never will be. It is written by Delphi developers for Delphi developers as a means to bridge two worlds. It’s a project of loyalty and passion. We continue because we love what it enables us to do.

The talks on Smart that I am holding now, including the november talk in London, were booked before I started at Embarcadero (so it’s not a case of me promoting Smart in leu of Embarcadero). I also made it perfectly clear when I accepted the job that my work on Smart will continue in my spare time. And Embarcadero is fine with that. So I am free to spend my after-work hours and weekend time as I see fit.

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The Smart Desktop, codename Amibian.js, is a solid foundation for building large-scale web front-ends. Importing Sencha’s JS API’s can be done via our TypeScript wizard

So, after my presentation in London in november Smart Mobile Studio presentations (at least hosted by me) can only take place during weekends. Which is fair and the way it should be.

Recording the English version

Since the presentation last evening was in Norwegian, there was little point in recording it. Norway have a healthy share of Delphi developers, but a programming language available internationally must be presented in English.

techA couple of months back, before I started working for Embarcadero I promised to do a video presentation that would be available on Delphi Developer and YouTube. I very much like to keep that promise. So I will re-do the presentation in English as soon as possible. I would have done it today after work, but buying tech from the US have changed quite dramatically in just a couple of years.

In short: I haven’t received the remaining equipment I ordered for professional video recording and audio podcasting (which is a part of my Patreon offering as well), as such there will be no live video-feed /slash/ webinar – and questions will be limited to either the comment-section on Delphi Developer; or perhaps more appropriate, the Smart Mobile Studio Forums.

I’m hoping to get the HD camera, mic-table-arm and various bits-and-bobs i ordered from the US sometime next week. I have no idea why FedEx have become so difficult lately, but the package is apparently at LaGuardia, and I have to send receipts that document that these items are paid for before they ship them abroad (so the package manifest listing me as the customer, my address, phone number and receipt from the seller is somehow not enough). This is a first for me.

Interestingly they also stopped a package from Embarcadero with giveaways for my upcoming Delphi presentation in Sweden – at which point I had to send them a copy of my work contract to prove that I indeed work for an American company.

But a promise is a promise, so come rain or shine it will be done. Worst case scenario we can put Samsung’s claims to the test and hook up a mic + photo lens and see if their commercials have any merit.

Linux: political correctness vs Gnu-Linux hacker spirit

September 26, 2018 6 comments

Unless you have been living under a rock, the turmoil and crisis within the Linux community these past weeks cannot have escaped you. And while not directly connected to Delphi or the Delphi Developer group on Facebook, the effects of a potential collapse within the core Linux development team will absolutely affect how Delphi developers go about their business. In the worst possible scenario, should the core team and it’s immediate extended developers decide to walk away, their code walks with them. Rendering much of the work countless companies have invested in the platform unreliable at best – or in need of a rewrite at worst (there is a legal blind-spot in GPL revision 1 and 2, allowing developers to rescind their code).

Large parts of the kernel would have to be re-invented, a huge chunk of the sub-strata and bedrock that distributions like Ubuntu, Mint, Kali and others rests on – could risk being removed, or rescinded as the term may be, from the core repositories. And perhaps worst of all, the hundreds of patches and new features yet to be released might never see the light of day.

To underline just how dire the situation has been the past couple of weeks, Richard Stallman, Eric S. Raymond, Linus Torvalds and others are threatening, openly and legally, to pull all their code (September 20th, Linux Kernel Mailing Listif the bullying by a handful of activist groups doesn’t stop. Linus is still in limbo having accepted the code of conduct these activist demand implemented, but has yet to return to work.

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Linus Torvalds is famous for many things, but his personality is not one of them

But the interesting part of the Linux debacle is not the if’s and but’s, but rather the methods used by these groups to get their way. How can you enforce a “code of conduct” using methods that themselves are in violation with that code of conduct? It really is a case of “do as I say, not as I do”; And it has escalated into a gutter fight masquerading as social warfare where slander, stigmata, false accusations and personal attacks of the worst possible type are the weapons. All of which is now having a real and tangible impact on business and technology.

Morally bankrupt actions is not activism

These activists, if they deserve that title, even went as far as deciding to dig into the sexual-life of one of the kernel developers. And when finding out that he was into BDSM (a form of sexual role-play), they publicly stigmatized the coder as rape sympathizer (!). Not because it’s true, but because the verbal association alone makes it easier for bullies like Coraline to justify the social execution of a man in public.

What makes my jaw drop in all this, is the complete lack of compassion these so-called activists demonstrate. They seem blind to the price of such stigmata for the innocent; not to mention the insult to people who have suffered sexual abuse in their lives. For each false accusation of rape that is made, the difficulty for actual abuse victims to seek justice increases exponentially. It is a heartless, unforgivable act.

Personally, I can’t say I understand the many sexual preferences people have these days. I find myself googling what the different abbreviations mean. The movie 50 shades of gray revolved around this stuff. But one thing is clear:  as long as there are consenting adults involved, it is none of our business. If there is evidence of a crime, then it should be brought before the courts. And no matter what we might feel about the subject at hand, it can never justify stigmatizing a person for the rest of his life. Not only is this a violation of the very code of conduct these groups wants implemented – it’s also illegal in most of the civilized world. And damn immoral and out-of-line if you ask me.

The goal cannot justify the means

The irony in all of this, is that the accusation came from Coraline herself. A transgender woman born in the wrong body; a furious feminist now busy fighting to put an end to bullying  of transgender minorities in the workplace (which she claims is the reason she got fired from Github). Yet she has no problems being the worst kind of bully herself on a global scale. I question if Coraline is even morally fit to represent a code of conduct. I mean, to even use slander such as rape-sympathizer in context with getting a code of conduct implemented? Digging into someones personal life and then using their sexual preference as leverage? It is utterly outrageous!

It is unacceptable and has no place in civilized society. Nor does a code of conduct, beyond ordinary expectations of decency and tolerance, have any place in a rebel motivated R&D movement like Linux.

Linux is not Windows or OS X. It was born out of the free software movement back in the late 1960’s (Stallman with GNU) and the Scandinavian demo and hacker scene during the 80’s and 90’s (the Linux kernel that GNU rests on). This is hacker territory and what people might feel about this in 2018 it utterly irrelevant. These are people that start the day with 4Chan for pete sake! The primary motivation of Stallman and Linus is to undermine, destroy and bury Microsoft and Apple in particular. And they have made no secret of this agenda.

Expecting Linux or their makers to be politically correct is infantile and naive, because Linux is at its heart a rebellion, “a protest of technical excellence and access to technology undermining commercial tyranny and corporate slavery”. That is not my personal opinion, that is straight out of a Richard Stallman book Free as in Freedom; His papers reads more like a religious manifesto; a philosophical foundation for a technological utopia, seeded and influenced by the hippie spirit of the 1960s. Which is where Stallman’s heart comes from.

You cannot but admire Stallman for sticking to his principles for 50+ years. And thinking he is going to just roll over because activists in this particular decade has a beef with how hackers address each other or comment their code, well — I don’t think these activists understand the hacker community at all. If they did they would back off and stop poking dragons.

Linux vs the sensitivity movement?

Yesterday I posted a video article that explained some of this in simple, easy terms on Delphi Developer. I picked the video that summed up the absurdities involved (as outlined above) as quickly as possible, rather than some 80 minute talk on YouTube. We have a long tradition of posting interesting IT news, things that are indirectly connected with Delphi, C++ builder or programming in general. We also post articles that have no direct connection at all – except being headlines within the world of IT. This helps people stay aware of interesting developments, trends and potential investments.

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The head of the “moral codex” doesn’t strike me as unbiased and without an axe to grind

As far as politics is concerned I have no interest what so ever. Nor would I post political material in the group because our focus is technology, Delphi, object pascal and software development in general. The exception being if there is a bill or law passed in the US or EU that affects how we build applications or handle data.

Well, this post was no different.

What was different was that some individuals are so acclimatized to political debate that they interpret everything as a political statement. So criticism of the methods used are made synonymous with criticism of a cause. This can happen to the best of us; human beings are passionate animals and I think we can all agree that politics has taken up an unusual amount of space lately. I can’t ever remember politics causing so much bitterness, divide and hate as it does today. Nor can I remember sound reason being pushed aside in favour of immediate emotional trends. And it really scares me.

Anyways, I wrote that “I stand by my god given rights to write obscene comments in my code“. Which is a reference to one of the topics Linus is being flamed for, namely his use of the F word in his own code. My argument is that, the kernel is ultimately Torvalds work, and it’s something he gives away for free. I dont have any need for obscenity in my code, but I sure as hell reserve the right to do so in my personal projects. How two external groups (in this case a very aggressive feminist group combined with LGBTQIA) should have any say in how Linus formats his code (or you for that matter) or the comments he writes – it makes no sense. It’s free, take it or leave it. And if you join a team and feel offended by how things are done, you either ignore it or leave.

It might not be appropriate of Linus to use obscenity in his comments, but do you really want people to tell you what you can or cannot write in your own code? Lord knows there are pascal units online that have language unfit for publishing, but nobody is forcing you to use them. I cant stand Java but I dont join their forums and sit there like a 12 year old bitching about how terrible Java is. It’s just infantile, absurd mentality.

So that is what my reference was to, and I took for granted that people would pick up on that since Linus is infamous for his spectacular rants in the kernel (and verbally in interviews). Some of his commits have more rants than code, which I find hilarious. There is a collection of them online and people read them for kicks because he is, for all means and purposes, the Gordon Ramsey of programming.

And I also made a reference to “tree hugging millennial moralists”. Not exactly hard-core statements in these trying times. We live in a decade where vegan customers are looking to sue restaurants for serving meat. Maybe I’m old-fashioned but for me, that is like something out of Monty Python or Mad Magazine. I respect vegans, but I will not be dictated by them.

I mean, the group people call millennials is after all recognized as a distinct generation due to a pattern of unreasonable demands on society (and in extreme cases, reality itself). In some parts of the world this is a real problem, because you have a whole generation that expects to bag upper-management salary on a paper route. When this is not met you face a tantrum and aggressiveness that should not exist beyond a certain age. Having a meltdown like a six-year-old when you are twenty-six is, well, not something I’m even remotely interested in dealing with.

And I speak from experience here, I had the misfortune of working with one extreme case for a couple of years. He had a meltdown roughly once a month and verbally abused everyone in the office. Including his boss. I still can’t believe he put up with it for so long, a lesser man would have physically educated him on the spot.

The sensitivity movement

But (and this is important) like always, a stereotype is never absolute. The majority within the millennial age group are nothing like these extreme cases. In fact we have two administrators in Delphi Developer that both fall under the millennial age group – yet they are the exact opposite of the stereotype. They are extremely hard-working, demonstrate good moral and good behavior, they give of themselves to the community and are people I am proud to call my friends.

The people I refer to as the sensitivity movement consists of men and women that hold, in my view, demands to life that are unreasonable. We live in times where for some reason, and don’t ask me why, minorities have gotten away with terrible things (slander, straw-men tactics, blame shifting, perversion of facts, verbal abuse, planting dangerous rumours and false accusation; things that can ruin a person for life) to impose their needs opposed to the greater good and majority. And no, this has nothing to do with politics, it has to do with expectation of normal decency and minding your own business. As a teenager I had my share of rebellion (some would say three shares), but I never blamed society; instead I wanted to understand why society was the way it is, which led me to studying history, comparative religion and philosophy.

The minorities of 2018 have no interest in understanding why, they mistake preference with offence, confuse kindness with weakness – and are painfully unable to discern knowledge from wisdom. The difference between fear and respect might be subtle, but on reflection a person should make important discoveries about their own nature. Yet this seem utterly lost on men and women in their 20s today.

And just to make things crystal clear: the minorities I am referring to here as the so-called sensitivity movement, are not the underprivileged or individuals suffering a disadvantage. The minorities are in fact highly privileged individuals – enjoying the very freedom of expression they so eagerly want taken away from people they don’t like. That is a very dangerous path.

Linux, the bedrock of the anti-establishment movement

The Linux community has a history of being difficult. Personally I find them both helpful and kind, but the core motivation behind Linux as a phenomenon cannot be swept under the carpet or ignored: these are rebels, rogues, people who refuse to bend the knee.

Linux itself is an act of defiance, and it exists due to two key individuals who both are extremely passionate by nature, namely Richard Stallman and Linus Torvalds.

Attacking these from all sides is shameful. I find no other words for it. Especially since its not a matter of principles or sound moral values, but rather a matter of pride and selfish ideals.

Name calling will not be tolerated

The reason I wrote this post was not to involve everyone in the dire situation of Linux, at least not to bring an external problem into our community and make it our problem. It was news that is of some importance.

I wrote this blogpost because a member somehow nicknamed me as “maga right-wing” something. And I’m not even sure how to respond to something like that.

First of all I have no clue what maga even is, I think it’s that cap slogan trump uses? Make america great again or something like that? Secondly, I live in Norway and know very little of the intricacies of domestic american politics. I have voted left for some 20 years, with exception of last norwegian election when I voted center. How my respect for Stallman and Linus, and how the hacker community operates (I grew up in the hacker community) – somehow connects me to some political agenda on another continent, is quite frankly beyond me.

But this is exactly the thing I wrote about above – the method being deployed by these groups. A person read something he or she doesn’t like, connects that to a pre-defined personality type, this is then supposed to justify wild accusations – and he or she then proceeded directly to treating someone accordingly. THAT behavior IS offensive to me, because there should be a dialog quite early in that chain of events. We have dialog to avoid causing harm – not as a means to cause further damage.

Is it the end of Linux as we know it?

No. Linus has been a loud mouth for ages, and he actually have people who purge his code of swear words (which is kinda funny) – but he has accepted the code of conduct and taken some time off.

The threat Stallman and the core team has made however is very real, meaning that the inner circle of Linux developers can flick the kill switch if they want to, but I think the negative press Coraline and those forcing their agenda onto the Linux foundation is getting, will make them regret it. And of course, articles like the New Yorker published didn’t help the situation.

Having said that, these developers are not normal people. Normal is a cut of average behavior. And neither Stallman, Linus of the hacker community fall under the term “normal” in the absolutesense of the word. Not a single individual that has done something of importance technologically fall under that group. Nor do they have any desire to be normal either, which is a death sentence in the hacker community. The lowest, most worthless status you can hold as a hacker, is normal.

These are people who build operating systems for fun. They are passion driven, artistic and highly emotional. And as such they could, should more gutter tricks be deployed, decide to burn the house down before they hand it over.

So it’s an interesting case well worth keeping an eye on. Preferably one that doesn’t add or subtract from what is there.

HexLicense, Patreon and all that

September 6, 2018 Comments off

Apparently using modern service like Patreon to maintain components has become a point of annoyance and confusion. I realize that I formulated the initial HexLicense post somewhat vague and confusing, in retrospect I will admit that and also take critique for not spending a little more time on preparations.

Having said that, I also corrected the mistake quickly and clarified the situation. I feel some of the comments have been excessively critical for something that, ultimately, is a service to the community. But I’ll roll with the punches and let’s just put this issue to bed.

From the top please

fromthetopI have several products and frameworks that naturally takes time to maintain and evolve. And having to maintain websites, pay for tax and invoicing services, pay for hosting (and so on), well it consumes a lot of hours. Hours that I can no longer afford to spend (my work at Embarcadero must come first, I have a family to support). So Patreon is a great way to optimize a very busy schedule.

Today developers solve a lot of the business strain by using Patreon. They make their products open source, but give those that support and help fund the development special perks, such as early access, special builds and a more direct line of control over where the different projects and sub-projects are heading.

The public repository that everyone has access to is maintained by pushing the code on interval, meaning that the public “free stuff” (LGPL v3 license) will be some months behind the early-access that patrons enjoy. This is common and the same approach both large and small teams go about things in 2018. Quite radical compared to what we “old-timers” are used to, but that’s how things work now. I just go with flow and try to do the most amount of good on the journey.

Benefits of Patreon

The benefits are many, but first and foremost it has to do with time. Developer don’t have to maintain 3-4 websites, pay for invoicing services on said products, pay hosting fees and rent support forums — instead focus is on getting things done. So instead of an hour here and there, you can (based on the level of support) allocate X hours within a week or weekend that are continuous.

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Patreon solves two things: time and cost

Everyone wins. Those that support and help fund the projects enjoy early access and special builds. The community at large wins because the public repository is likewise maintained, albeit somewhat behind the cutting edge code patrons enjoy. And the developers wins because he or she doesn’t have to run around like a mad chicken maintaining X number of websites -wasting more time doing maintenance than building cool new features.

 

And above all, pricing goes down. By spreading the cost over a larger base of interest, people get access to code that used to cost $200 for $35. The more people that helps out, the more the cost can be reduced per tier.

To make it crystal clear what the status of my frameworks and component packages are, here is a carbon copy from HexLicense.com

For immediate release

Effective immediately HexLicense is open-source, released under the GNU Lesser General Public License v3. You can read the details of that license by clicking here.

Patreon model

Patreon_logo.svgIn order to consolidate the various projects I maintain, I have established a Patreon account. This means that people can help fund further development on HexLicense, LDEF, Amibian and various Delphi libraries as a whole. This greatly simplifies things for everyone.

I will be able to allocate time based on a broader picture, I also don’t need to pay for invoicing services, web hosting and more. This allows me to continue to evolve the components and code, but without so many separate product identities to maintain.

Patreon supporters will receive updates before anyone else and have direct access to the latest code at all times. The public bitbucket repository will be updated on interval, but will by consequence be behind the Patreon updates.

Further security

One of the core goals on Patreon is the evolution of a bytecode compiler. This should be of special interest to HexLicense users. Being able to compile modules that hackers will be unable to debug gives you a huge advantage. The engine is designed so that the instruction-set can be randomized for a particular build. Making it unique for your application.

patron_asm1

The LDEF assembler prototype running under Smart Mobile Studio

Well, I want to thank everyone involved. It has been a great journey to produce so many components, libraries and solutions over the years – but now it’s time for me to cut down on the number of projects and focus on core technology.

HexLicense with the update license files will be uploaded to BitBucket shortly.

Sincerly

Jon Lennart Aasenden

 

 

Support my work on Patreon, get awesome stuff

September 2, 2018 3 comments

For well over a decade now I have tried my best to be of service to the Delphi community. I run six pascal forums on Facebook, I teach Delphi for free in my spare time and I help people solve problems, find jobs and get inspired.

“to utterly re-write the traditional development toolchain and create
a desktop environment and development studio that is unbound
by chipset, cpu and platform”

I am about to embark on the biggest journey I have ever undertaken, namely to deliver a technological platforms that combined will give both users and developers unprecedented advantages.

patreon

Support my work by becoming a patron

The challenge with new and awesome technology, is that it can be difficult to convey. The full implications of something revolutionary needs a little bit of gestation, maturity and overview before the “OMG” factor hits home. But thankfully the Delphi and Smart Pascal community is amongst the most learned, creative and innovative I have ever seen. Not to mention the Amiga retro scene that also have supported me – a group made up of hardware wizards, FPGA programmers and hackers that eat assembly code for breakfast.

I won’t dazzle you with empty promises or quick fixes. Every part of what I present here is rooted in code I have running in my lab. I hope that the doors Smart Mobile Studio have opened, the work I have done on the RTL and the products I have made – that they at least have earned me your patience; and that you will read this and see if it’s worthy of your support.

Context

When we released Smart Mobile Studio 3.0 we made a live web desktop demo to showcase some of the potential the technology has to offer. What was not mentioned was that this in fact was not a mockup or slap-dash demo intended to impress you with Quake III or the Bassoon music tracker. It has deeper roots and is a re-formation on the Quartex Desktop API that has been an essential part of Smart Mobile Studio since the beginning.

The desktop, codename Amibian.js, is actually a platform that is a part of a larger, loftier goal. One that was outlined to investors as early as 2013. Sadly I was unable to secure funds for it, despite the fact that two companies are using the prototype for kiosk and embedded systems already (city kiosk terminals in Spain running on ODroid XU4 ARM boards, and also an educational platform for schools in New Zealand).

The goal, to cut it short, is quite simply: to utterly re-write the traditional development toolchain and create a desktop environment and development studio that is unbound by chipset, cpu and platform. In other words, to re-implement and build a “visual studio” environment that lives completely in the cloud, that can be accessed by any modern browser, on any operating system, anywhere in the world.

I’m not talking about Notepad or Ace here, I am talking about a complete IDE with form designer, database designer, cloud endpoints, multi language support and above all – the ability to compile and deploy both virtual and native applications through established build services. All of it JavaScript, all of it running on Node.js, Electron or HTML5.

You wont be drag & dropping components, you will be dropping entire ecosystems.

Smart Mobile Studio, new tools for a new age

When I started some eight years ago, this would have been impossible. There were no compilers that could take a complex language like object pascal or C++ and successfully express that as JavaScript. JavaScript on its own, at least compared to C++ or Delphi, is quite poor. Things we take for granted like classes, linear inheritance, virtual and abstract methods (requires a VMT), interfaces (and more) simply does not exist. There have been some advances lately of course, but JavaScript is and will always be, a prototype based runtime system.

For eight years the Smart Mobile Studio team have worked to create the ecosystem needed to make large-scale application development for JSVM (Javascript virtual machine, the browser, Phonegap, NodeJS and more) a reality. We have forged the compiler, the support code and an RTL spanning thousands of classes from scratch.

If is now possible to write JS based applications that rival native applications both in scope and complexity. This has without a doubt been one of the hardest tasks I have ever been involved in.

With Smart Mobile Studio in place and the foundation stone set – we can finally get to work on the real product. Namely a cloud forge unlike any other.

The Amibian desktop environment

The desktop platform that forms the basis of my work – was nicknamed Amibian due to its visual inspiration from Amiga OS 4.1, a modern but somewhat obscure operating system for PPC computers. But while there are cunning visual similarities, Amibian.js is a very different beast under the hood.

First of all Amibian.js is written from scratch to be cloud oriented. The Ragnarok message server at the heart of the system, is capable of delegating hundreds of users each dispatching high data volume simultaneously. It is a server system that is designed from scratch to be clustered, scalable and distributed.

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The Ragnarok message protocol performs brilliantly, here testing IO messages live

You can run it together with the client, forming an OS much like ChromeOS, on something as small as a Tinkerboard ($70 embedded board) or scale it to a 100 node Amazon cluster. If node.js can be installed, Amibian can run. CPU or chipset is quite frankly irrelevant.

This is the foundation that the next generation IDE and compiler toolchain will be built on. A toolchain that doesn’t care if you prefer Linux, Windows, OSX or Android.

If you have a HTML5 compliant browser, you can create full-scale applications with the same level of depth as Delphi, and target 8 operating systems and more than 50 embedded devices.

What does that mean for Delphi users

Like Smart Mobile Studio, Amibian is not meant to compete with Delphi. It is designed to complement and extend Delphi – allowing Delphi developers to reach avenues where native code might be impractical or less cost-effective.

The new compiler is based around the LDEF virtual machine specification that I drafted spring 2018. It is written in Smart Pascal and runs on every system that node.js supports (which as of writing is substantial). LDEF is a bytecode specification designed to make native code generation easy. Unlike .Net or Java, LDEF is a register based virtual machine. It is a cross-section of how ARM, x86 and MC68000 CPU’s work in real life. It has stacks, registers, condition flags, data control, program control, absolute and relative addressing; and of course instructions that all CPUs support.

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The LDEF assembler is implemented completely in Smart Pascal. The picture shows the testbed with a visual coding editor. The assembler is meant to run under node.js server-side but can also be hosted on a website or post compiled into a native executable

When executing this bytecode under JavaScript, the runtime uses the subset of JavaScript called “Asm.js” out of the box. AsmJS is more mature than WebAssembly and less restrictive (modules are not sandboxed from the DOM). So to make it short: the code runs close to native courtesy of JIT optimization.

LDef is modular, meaning that parser, compiler, assembler and codegen (the part that converts bytecodes it to something else) are separate modules. Writing a WebAssembly codegen, x86 codegen or ARM codegen can be done separately without breaking the existing tooling.

patron_asm2

Having assembled the code (see picture above) the list command dumps the bytecodes to the console in readable fashion. It is then disassembled using the “dasm” command.

The LDEF prototype has been completely written in Smart Pascal, but a port is underway for Delphi and C++ builder. This gives Delphi developers the benefit of using bytecode libraries in their code. If you install Delphi server-side, you can use Amibian as a pure web front end for Delphi (!)

Create applications anywhere, on anything

Since everything is JavaScript you are no longer bound to chipset or CPU. You can set up Amibian on Amazon or Azure, an office server or an affordable, off the shelves SBC (single board computer). You can daisy chain 10 older PC’s into a cluster and get 5 more years out of the hardware; the compiler is made in JS; it doesn’t care if the real CPU is outdated. It cares about bytes and endian-ness, that’s it.

Screenshot

Early implementation of the desktop, here running native 68k (Amiga) code directly. Both x86 and PPC runtimes are now possible – the days of cloud are here

You can be on holiday in Spain armed only with an iPad and a BlueTooth keyboard, and should inspiration strike, you can login and write your application without even installing an app on your iPad. You just need a modern browser to start writing applications.

Patreon Tiers

Depending on your level of support, you get access to different parts of my work. As of writing I have 4 frameworks that is being maintained and that I want to continue to maintain for those that support me:

  • $5: High five! Support the work as a nice gesture
  • $10: Access to and support for developing my tweening library for VCL
  • $25: License management for VCL and FMX, full source code access to Hexlicense and support for porting Ironwood to Delphi + a new REST based registration server
  • $35: Rage libraries, get full access to the ByteRage database framework, Pixelrage graphics library and support their evolution. The timeline includes SQL and condition parsing which will not be covered by the current running tutorial. Want a clean Delphi alternative to SQLite? Well, let me make it for you.
  • $45: LDEF assembler and virtual machine. Get full source code access to the Smart Pascal assembler (runs on node.js) and the Delphi port as soon as it rolls off the assembly line (pun intended). Enjoy proper documentation for instructions, bytecode format and enjoy both the native and web assembler application! As a bonus, this level gives you access to video tutorials and recordings dealing with LDEF, HexLicense, Tweening and everything else.
  • $50: Amibian and Ragnarok: Amibian.js client, server and development toolchain.
    This is the motherload and you get to enjoy all of it before anyone else.

    • Full access to beta builds, updates, new features – all of it before anyone else!
    • Explore the Ragnarok client / server message API
    • Follow my video tutorials and let me help you dig into Smart Pascal and node.js
    • Ask questions and get a deeper understanding of both Smart Mobile Studio, Amibian.js and LDEF.
    • Have a front seat reserved as we unleash the power of Delphi, Smart Pascal and JavaScript on the world.
  • $100: Amibian Embedded Setup: For the true Amibian.js supporters! You get all the perks of previous tiers, but with an added bonus of pre-made Amibian.js disk images for the ODroid XU4 and the Asus Tinkerboard once LDEF and the IDE has been implemented.These disk images starts the Ragnarok server as a daemon (Linux Service) during the boot sequence. The system then continues booting into a full-screen webview that renders the Amibian.js desktop. There is no Linux desktop involved.
    This is by far the most cost effective setup for Kiosk and Embedded work with either a touch display or keyboard access.

    As an extra perk this version of Amibian.js contains an optimized version of uae.js (Amiga emulation) and is capable of executing ADF disks and harddisk images directly in their own window.

    With the service layer now fully developed, combined with truly platform independent compiler technology – we have in fact created an interesting alternative to ChromeOS. One with a minimal footprint that is cost effective and easy to expand. A system that you have full control over and can change, rebrand, modify and enjoy!

    Congratulations! You have helped bring Amibian.js and a whole new development paradigm into this world!

If this wets your appetite then head over to my Patreon site and show your support! I start shipping code to those that support me next week, so get onboard and let’s make it happen!

Final words

26229892_10155095303530906_800744220432589611_nPatreon is not the same as a kickstarter or a formal investment, I think this is important to underline. I hope however that you find my work interesting and that you would like to see this realized.

LDEF is not just a fancy bytecode runtime, it is also a framework that other developers can use to make new languages. The whole point of this is to blow the old limitations away and to really push technology to the maximum.

Being able to write system services that work the same on all operating-systems, and then deploy entire ecosystems – this used to be science fiction. Now it’s not.

I want to thank those that have become patrons – it really means so much! If enough support my work I can allocate more time for implementing the tools the community needs and be of greater service to everyone.

Thank you for your time

Jon Lennart Aasenden

Getting organized: register a Delphi user group or club!

August 28, 2018 Leave a comment

It’s been a hectic week at Delphi Developer, but a highly productive one! I am very happy that so many developers have responded and help with the organizational work. Because Delphi and C++ builder developers must get organized. If you want to see lasting, positive results, this has to happen. There are wast quantities of individuals, groups and companies that use Delphi and C++ builder around the world. Yet we all sit in our own bubble, thinking we are alone. It’s time to change that.

“we have decades of experience and technical expertise. And that is worth protecting”

In 2016 I was contacted by a Norwegian HR company (read: head hunters) and offered a Delphi position as at a local business. Turned out the business had struggled to find Delphi programmers for over six months. When I told them about Oslo Delphi club and showed them the 7500 members we have in Delphi Developer on Facebook, they were gobsmacked. The human resource company was equally oblivious to the sheer number of Developers just in Norway, let alone internationally.

Part of what I do today as an Embarcadero SC, is to front human-resource companies with clear information as to where they can look for competent Delphi developers. But in order to deliver that effectively, we first have to establish a map.

Put your local club or interest group on the map!

Last friday (24.08.2018) I published an open document on Delphi Developer. This is a document open and available to everyone, with the sole purpose of making it easier for developers to find clubs and interest groups in their region (jobs are often found through acquaintances, so connecting to a local group is important). It will also simplify how we as a community can approach human resource companies. Our document is growing but we still need more! So please take five minutes to add your local user group.

Ebusiness Concept

The Delphi and C++ builder community is large, but we need representation with HR

Delphi and C++ builder is seeing a stable and healthy growth. It has taken a lot of hard work and effort to get where we are today, both by Embarcadero and developers that use RAD Studio as their business backbone.

My hope is that everyone who read this can allocate few minutes, just five minutes to add to our document. So if you know of a Delphi or C++ builder user group, perhaps a club or organization? Then please check the document (Note: The document is pinned as an announcement on top of the Facebook group feed, but members can also reach it directly by clicking here) and add the club if it’s not already there.

Note: Please make sure that the information is correct. Call the club or group if possible. Remember, this document is for everyone. We want to maintain the document and keep it available 24/7.

Building bridges

The work members are doing for the community is quite important. It determines where we can go next. In fact, I will contact each and every club to establish communication and co-operation. There is much to debate, such as capacity for tutoring, courseware, primary contact for new users and more. If need be I will personally travel so we can meet face to face. I am deadly serious about this, because there is no other way to build critical mass. Our group alone have thousands of members whom have invested a lot of money in software, components, formal training and education; we have decades of experience and technical expertise. And that is worth protecting.

Getting organized to safeguard our education, our language of preference, our jobs and ultimately to nurture our future is a worthy cause. I hope I have everyone’s blessing in this — but I can’t do everything alone. It is impossible for me to know if there are 3 Delphi clubs in Venezuela, 4 in Canada and 15 in India. We need to get them pinned on a map and formulate a strategy for lasting, positive results.

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The past is experience, the future is opportunities

I want to thank each and every one that has added to the document. Thank you so much, this will help our community more than you think. It might seem as a small step, but that first step is the most important of them all. All great things start as an idea, but when you apply force and determination – it becomes reality.

I am extremely lucky because this work is now a part of my job. My work includes a bit of everything: studies, authoring, coding, consulting and presentations. But the part I love the most is to connect people.

Real life results

If you think the document in question is a waste of time, think again!

4a128ea6852444fbfc89022be4132e9bLast week we had 3 rather frustrated members that desperately needed a job. After calming the situation down I made some calls and was able to find remote work for all of them.

It is a wonderful feeling when you can help someone. It is also what community is all about. The more organized we get, the better it will be for everyone. LinkedIn is great but networking without an infrastructure that responds can bear no fruits. And that is where Delphi Developer comes in. We are very much alive and kicking.

So with less than a week of organization behind us, we found and delivered jobs as a direct consequence of the Delphi Developer Facebook Group.

 

My role at Embarcadero

August 8, 2018 4 comments

I have gotten quite a few requests regarding what exactly I’m doing at Embarcadero. I have elaborated quite a bit on Delphi Developer. But I fully understand that not everyone is on Facebook, and I don’t mind elaborating a bit more if that helps. So here is a quick “drive-by” post on that.

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Setting sails for America

Sadly the facts of life are that I can’t talk about everything openly, that would violate the responsibility I have accepted in our NDA (non disclosure agreement), as well as personal trust between myself and the people involved. Hopefully everyone can sympathize with the situation.

My title is SC, Software Consultant, which is a branch under sales and support. I talk with companies about their needs, help them find competent employees, deliver ad-hoc solutions on site in my region and act as a “go to” guy that CTO’s can call on when they need something. And of course part of my role is to hold presentations, advocate Delphi and evangelize.

I am really happy about this because for the past 8 years I have been up to my nose in brain grinding, low-level compiler and rtl development; and while that is intellectually rewarding, it indirectly means everything else is on hold. With the release of Smart Mobile Studio 3.0 the product has reached a level of maturity where fixes and updates will be more structured. Focus is now on specific modules and specific components – which sadly doesn’t warrant a full-time job. So it’s been an incredible eight years at The Smart Company, and Smart is not going away (just to underline that) – but right now Delphi comes first. So my work on the RTL and the new compiler framework is partitioned accordingly.

Being able to advocate, represent and work with Delphi and C++ builder is a dream job come true. I have been fronting Delphi, helped companies and connected people within the community for 15 years anyways; and the companies and people I talk with are the same that I talked to last month. Not to mention new faces and people who have just discovered Delphi, or come back to Delphi after years elsewhere.

So being offered to do what I already love doing as a full-time job, I don’t see how I could have turned that down. As a teenager we used to talk about what company we wanted to work for. I remember a buddy of mine was absolutely fanatical about IBM, and he even went on to work for “big blue” after college. Others wanted to work at Microsoft, Oracle, Sun — but for me it was always Borland. And I have stuck with Delphi through thick and thin. Delphi has never failed me. Not once.

I set out to get object-pascal back on the map eight years ago. I have actively lobbied, blogged, started usergroups (our Facebook group now house 7500+ active Delphi developers), petitioned educational institutions, held presentations and done everything short of tattooing Delphi on my skin to make that a reality. Taking object-pascal out of education has been a catastrophe for software development as a whole.

Well, I hope this sheds some light on the role and what I do. I’m not a “professional blogger” like some have speculated. I do try to keep things interesting, but there is very little professional about my personal blog (which would be a paradox). But obviously my writing and presentations will have to adapt; meaning longer articles, on-topic writing style and good reference material.

I will be speaking in Oslo quite soon, then Sweden before I pop off to London in november. Very much looking forward to that. The London presentation and Oslo presentation will be hybrid talks, looking at Delphi and also how Smart Mobile Studio can help Delphi developers broaden the impact and ease web development for existing Delphi solutions. The talk in Sweden will be pure Delphi and C++ builder.

Get in touch with Jason Chapman or Adam Brett at the UK Delphi usergroup for more info

New article series on Delphi and C++ builder

August 7, 2018 4 comments

An army of Delphi developers

It’s been a while since I’ve done some hardcore Delphi articles, and since that is now my job I am happy that I can finally allocate a good chunk of time for that work. Dont worry, there will be plenty of Smart Pascal content too – but I think it’s time to clean up the blog situation a bit. This blog is personal and thus contains a pot-pourri of topics, from programming to 3d printing, embedded hardware to retro-gaming. It’s a fun blog, I enjoy being able to write about things I’m passionate about, but having one blog for each topic makes more sense.

So in the near future I think it’s good that I publish Smart Mobile Studio content (except random stuff and drive-by posts) to http://www.smartmobilestudio.com, and Delphi to Embarcadero’s blog server. If nothing else it will be easier for the readers to deal with. If you only want to read about my Delphi escapades then embedded and retro stuff is not always interesting.

Deep dive into Delphi and C++ builder

So what can be cool to write about? I spent the better part of last weekend pondering this. Delphi articles have a little blind spot between beginner and advanced that I would like to focus on. There are plenty of “learn Delphi” articles out there, and there are likewise a lot of very advanced topics. So hopefully my first series will hit where it should, and be interesting for those in between.

We need a light database

Let’s peek under the hood!

Right, so the last time I read about database coding, and I mean “making your own database engine” was at least 10 years ago. The Delphi community has always been blessed with a large group of insightful and productive people, people who share their knowledge and help others. But everyone is working on something and finding the time to deep dive into subjects like this is not always easy. So hopefully my series on this will at least inspire people to experiment, try new things and fall in love with Delphi like I did.

The second article series that I am working on right now, is getting to grips with C++ builder. This is actually a very fun experiment since it serves more than a single function; I mean, just how hard is it for a Delphi developer to learn C++ ? What can Embarcadero do to help developers feel comfortable on both platforms? What are the benefits for a Delphi developer to learn C/C++?

 

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C++ builder Community Edition rocks!

And yes I have had more than one episode where the new concepts drove me up the wall. It would be the world’s shortest article-series if Delphi Developer didn’t have my back and I didn’t buy books. Say what you will about modern programming, but sometimes you just need to sit down, turn off the computer, and read. Old school but effective.

Reflections

Embarcadero is very different from what I expected. Before I worked here (which is still a bit surrealistic) I envisioned a stereotypical american company, located in some tall office building; utterly remote from its users and the needs of the punters in the field. This past week has forced me to reflect more than I would have liked, and my armour of strong opinions (if not arrogance) has a very visible dent; because the company that has welcomed me with open arms is everything but that imaginary stereotype.

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Et in Borland ego sum

The core of Embarcadero turned out to be a team of dedicated developers that are literally bending backwards to help as many developers as possible. I left yesterdays meeting with a taste of shame in my mouth, because in my blog I have given at least two of the people who now welcomed me, a less than fortunate overhaul in the past. Yet they turned out to be human beings with the exact same interests, passions and goals as myself.

Building large-scale development tools is really hard work. Seriously. As a developer you forget things like marketing, the sales apparatus, the level of support a developer will need, documentation, tutorials. The amount of requests, conflicting requests that is, from users is overwhelming. You have users who focus on mobile who don’t care about legacy VCL support, then you have people who very much need VCL legacy support and dont care at all about mobile platforms; It’s a huge list of groups, topics and goals that is constantly shifting and needs prioritization.

But all in all the Delphi community and Embarcadero is in good shape. They have worked through a lot of old baggage that simply had to be transitioned, and the result is the change we see now: community editions and better dialog with the users. Compare that to the situation we had five years ago, or eight years ago for that matter. The changes have been many and the road long -but with a purpose: Delphi is growing at a healthy rate again.

What will you need and what will we do?

The goal of the Delphi article is to implement the underlying mechanics of a database. I’m not talking about a “file of record” here or something like that, but a page and sequence based filestream and it’s support apparatus for managing blocks and available resources. This forms the basis of all databases, large or small. So we will be coding the nitty-gritty that has to be in place before you venture into expression parsing.

510242661If time allows I will implement support for filters, but naturally a full SQL parser would be over the top. The techniques demonstrated should be more than enough for a budding young developer to take the ball and run with it. The filter function is somewhat close to a “select” statement – and the essence of expression parsing will be in the filter code.

Note: I will skip memory mapping techniques, for one reason only: it can get in the way of understanding the core principles. Once you have the principles under wraps – memory mapping is the natural next step and evolution of the thoughts involved, so it will fall into place in due time.

You wont need anything special, just Delphi. Most of the code will be classical object pascal, but the parser will throw in some generics and operators, so this is a good time to download the community edition or upgrade to a compiler from this century.

The C/C++ articles will likewise have zero dependencies except the community edition of C++ builder. I went out and bought two books, C++ Primer fifth edition and The C++ programming language by Bjarne Stroustrup himself. Which should be on presciption because i fell at sleep

My frontal lobe is already reduced to jello at the sight of these books, but let’s jump in with both feet and see what we make of it from a Delphi developers point of view. I can’t imagine it can be more of a mess than raw webassembly, but C/C++ has a wingspan that rivals even Delphi so it’s wise not to underestimate the curriculum.

OK, let’s get cracking! I will see you all shortly and post the first Delphi article.

Paypal, enough is enough

April 20, 2018 6 comments

I used to love PayPal. Really, it was a brilliant solution to a global problem.
As a software developer living in Norway, where I spend most of my time with people who live and work in the United States, India or the Arab Emirates – commerce can sometimes be a challenge. It’s a strange situation to be in, where you have lunch with people thousands of miles away. You call up your friends in NYC after work just like you would a friend down the street; and in the weekend you share a cold beer over video chat, or team up on Playstation to enjoy a game together.

I have become, for all means and purposes, an american by proxy.

s949607563640099117_p14_i1_w1000As a software developer part of what I do is to produce software components. These are intricate blocks of code that can be injected into programs, thus saving other developers the time it takes to implement the functionality from scratch. This is a fantastic thing because one person cannot possibly cope with “everything”. Buying components and libraries is a fundamental part of what a software manager does when prototyping a new product. It is a billion dollar industry and it’s not going away any time soon.

The reason is simple: if you hire someone to research, implement and test something you need in your product, the wages you pay will be 10-100 times higher than if you just buy a pre-fabricated module. I mean, allocating 2 developers to work full-time for a month to make a PDF rendering component (as an example of a complex component) will cost you two months salary. This also leaves you with the responsibility for bugs, updates – the whole nine yards.

“PayPal has a policy where it completely ignores the voice of merchants. They automatically side with the customer and will thus remove funds from your account as they please”

Lets say you have two junior developers making $6000 a month each, coupled with an estimate of 8 weeks to finish the functionality (which is always wrong, so add a couple of weeks for Q&A), that brings us to $12000 + $6000 = $18000. OR — you can just buy a ready to use component for $500 and have PDF support up and running in a day. This also delegates bug-fixing, documentation and updates onto the vendor.

When I wanted to set up shop, I figured that PayPal would be an excellent platform to use. I mean, it’s been around for so long that it’s become intrinsic to international, online economics. It’s available everywhere, and their percentage of sales is reasonable.

Well, that turned out to be a mistake. PayPal is not cool at all when you move from consumer to merchant. Which takes weeks by the way if you live outside the US. You have to send in photocopies of your passport, credit card receipts and social security information; which is illegal in Norway and a serious breach of privacy.

It’s only your money if we allow it

We live in a world where there are a lot of terrible people. People that sell broken goods, that lie, steal and is willing to do just about anything if it benefits them. Honesty is almost regarded as a burden in online business, which I detest and refuse to take part in.

“The second and third calls [to PayPal] resulted in 45 and 90 minutes of “please hold”. They literally exhausted their own merchant to make the case go away.”

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UPS is on my door more than the average American household. This is the new reality.

Lord knows I have been victim to some extremely unjust sales representative in my time (havent we all). And the experience has often been that you are helpless once you have received a product. It doesn’t matter if the product you received was faulty, the wrong size – or even the wrong bloody product! As a consumer you often have to calculate how much it will cost you to fight back. And more often than not, fighting back costs more than just accepting that you have been ripped off. I mean, nobody is stupid enough to return the wrong goods to China (for example), because you will never hear from them again.

Well, once I switched from being just a consumer to selling goods and becoming a PayPal merchant – I was shocked to discover that it’s the same situation on the other side! But not from small, semi anonymous scam artists; no it turned out to be PayPal.

PayPal has a policy where it completely ignores the voice of merchants. They automatically side with the customer and will thus remove funds from your account as they please. This happens without a dialog with you as a merchant first. They just waltz in and help themselves to your funds. It’s like something out of a 12th century trial where you are guilty by default and thus there is no room for documentation or evidence to the contrary.

“PayPal didn’t even bother to contact me for verification or comments. They just helped themselves to my registered credit card – which in Norway would have landed them in jail for theft.”

In my case where I sell software components, which by nature is digital and delivered via e-mail, that leaves me as a vendor completely without a voice.

Just weeks ago I got a strange e-mail from a customer who claimed he had not received my software. I naturally took that very seriously so I checked, double checked and triple checked that the software had been sent. I also checked the log on my server to see if the download ticket had been activated (it is marked as active when a full download has been completed. It remains open for 12 months which is the duration of the license).

Well the ticket was active, so there was no doubt that the customer had indeed downloaded the product. And it was downloaded in full. The server picks up on partial downloads so it doesn’t activate should the customer have network problems.

But hey, accident can happen, maybe the customer managed to delete the file or his hard disk was damaged. I gave him the benefit of the doubt and informed him that the ticket has been activated, but he can download as many times as he wants for the duration of 12 months.

In return I got an email saying: “He he, its all good. Thx!

Well, it sure was all good for him, but not for me. Not only had this man downloaded and made use of my product, he sent a false claim to PayPal stating that he never received the software. And since PayPal can’t deal with packages that are not shipped through their explicit channels (which is made for physical goods, not digital), that was that.

PayPal didn’t even bother to contact me for verification or comments. They just helped themselves to my registered credit card – which in Norway would have landed them in jail for theft.

“A parallel is of a man entering a store, buying an ice-cream, slowly removing the wrapping and starting to eat – while walking over to the store manager claiming, he never got an ice-cream to begin with.”

Had PayPal bothered to contact me, which both Norwegian and European law demands, I could easily document that the customer had indeed downloaded and activated the product. I have both the e-mails between the customer and myself, as well as the ticket logs from the hosting company I use.

There is no doubt that this ticket has been spent, only hours before this scam artist sent his false claim to PayPal.

International vs. national law

Norwegian law gives a merchant 3 chances to rectify a situation. This law applies where the customer has not received what they ordered, where they have received a broken item – or where there has been problems with delivery.

When you sell software however, there are two types with very different rules attached to them. The second method is rarely used outside the world of engineering:

  • Compiled proprietary software, which doesn’t avail how the product is made and the customer does not have access to the source code.
  • Source code for proprietary software, where the customer receives the actual source code for the product and are allowed to adapt the code. But there are strict rules for not sharing or re-selling this – since it’s very much intellectual property and once shared, cannot be un-shared.

The latter, source code packages (which is what my customer bought), also falls under “spoilables”, meaning that once the customer has received the package, they cannot return it. This applies to other goods too, such as underwear. Since the merchant cannot know if the product has been used (or copied in the case of source-code) – there is never any return policy on such goods once delivered. If the product has not been delivered however, normal return policies apply.

Since PayPal is an American company, I can understand there is some aversion for adapting their services to every known framework of law known to mankind. But I cannot imagine that American legislation on this topic can differ much from Norwegian law. Selling compiled code vs. source-code are two very different things. Comparable to frozen goods and fresh goods. You dont have a 3 week return policy on fruit for obvious reasons.

A parallel is of a man entering a store, buying an ice-cream, slowly removing the wrapping and starting to eat – while walking over to the store manager claiming, he never got an ice-cream to begin with.

There is no way in hell that this would fly with an american store manager. A friend of mine in San-Diego was so upset on my behalf that he called Paypal directly, but they refused to comment without written consent from me. Which I then sent, only to magically disappear.

The second and third calls resulted in 45 and 90 minutes of “please hold”. They literally exhausted their own merchant to make the case go away.

PayPal, trust is a two way street

This episode has shocked me. In fact it has forced me to close my PayPal merchant account permanently. And I will avoid using PayPal as much as possible until they can show normal, human decency for law-abiding citizen, regardless of what country they come from.

Would you run a business with a third-party that can just help themselves to your accounts? I can’t imagine anyone would.

I have no problem giving a customer his money back, provided the delivery ticket is un-spent. Had the customer been unable to download or somehow gain access to the product – then of course normal money back rules apply. I’m not out to cheat anyone, nor am I hard to talk with.

But when there is no dialog at all – and your “bank” ignores the fact that some people are willing to do anything to cheat his fellow-man, that’s when I pack up and leave.

The Amiga ARM project

April 19, 2018 5 comments

This has been quite the turbulent week. Without getting into all the details, a post that I made with thoughts and ideas for an Amiga inspired OS for ARM escaped the safe confines of our group, Amiga Disrupt, and took on a life of its own.
This led to a few critical posts being issued publicly, which all boiled down to a misunderstanding. Thankfully this has been resolved and things are back to normal.

The question on everyone’s lips now seem to be: did Jon mean what he said or was it just venting frustration? I thought I made my points clear in my previous post, but sadly Commodore USA formulated a title open for interpretation (which is understandable considering the mayhem at the time). So let’s go thrugh the ropes and put this to rest.

Am I making an ARM based Amiga inspired OS?

Hopefully I don’t have to. My initial post, the one posted to the Amiga Disrupt comment section (and mistaken for a project release note), had a couple of very clear criteria attached:

If nothing has been done to improve the Amiga situation [with regards to ARM or x86] by the time I finish Amibian.js (*), I will take matters into my own hand and create my own alternative.

(*) As you probably know, Amibian.js is a cloud implementation of Amiga OS, designed to bring Amiga to the browser. It is powered by a node.js application server; a server that can be hosted either locally (on the same machine as the html5 client) or remotely. It runs fine on popular embedded devices such as Tinkerboard and ODroid, and when run in a full-screen browser with no X or Windows desktop behind it – it is practically indistinguishable from the real thing.

We have customers who use our prototype to deliver cloud based learning for educational institutions. Shipping ready to use hardware units with pre-baked Amibian.js installed is perfect for schools, libraries, museums, routers and various kiosk projects.

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Amibian.js, here running Quake 3 at 60 fps in your browser

Note: This project started years before FriendOS, so we are not a clone of their work.

Obviously this is a large task for one person, but I have written the whole system in Smart Mobile Studio, which is a product our company started some 7 years ago, and that now has a team of six people behind it. In short it takes object pascal code such as Delphi and Freepascal, and compiles this to JavaScript. Suitable for both the browser and NodeJS. It gives you a full IDE with form designer, drag & drop visual components and a wast and rich RTL (run-time library) which naturally saves me a lot of time. So this gives me an edge over other companies working with similar technology. So while it’s a huge task, it’s leveraged considerably by the toolchain I made for it.

So am I making a native OS for ARM or x86? The short answer: I will if the situation havent dramatically improved by the time Amibian.js is finished.

Instead of wasting years trying to implement everything from scratch, Pascal Papara took the Linux kernel and ran with it. So Aeros boots by virtue of the Linux Kernel, but jumps straight into Aros once the drivers has loaded

If you are thinking “so what, who the hell do you think you are?” then perhaps you should take a closer look at my work and history.

I am an ex Quartex member, which was one of the most infamous hacking cartels in europe. I have 30 years of software development behind me, having worked as a professional developer since the age of 17. I have a history of taking on “impossible” projects and finding ways to deliver them. Smart Mobile Studio itself was deemed impossible by most Delphi developers; It was close to heresy, triggering an avalanche of criticism for even entertaining the idea that object pascal could be compiled to JavaScript. Let alone thrive on JSVM (JavaScript Virtual Machine).

assembler

Amibian.js runs javascript, but also bytecodes. Here showing the assembler prototype

You can imagine the uproar when our generated JavaScript code (compiled from object pascal) actually bested native code. I must admit we didn’t expect that at all, but it changed the way Delphi and object pascal developers looked at the world – for the better I might add.

What I am good at, is taking ordinary off the shelves parts and assembling them in new and exciting ways. Often ways the original authors never intended; in order to produce something unique. My faith is not in myself, but in the ability and innate capacity of human beings to find solutions. The biggest obstacle to progress is ultimately pride and fear of losing face. Something my Buddhist training beat our of me ages ago.

So this is not an ego trip, it’s simply a coder that is completely fed-up with the perpetual mismanagement that has held Amiga OS in captivity for two decades.

Amiga OS is a formula, and formulas are bulletproof

People love different aspects of the same thing – and the Amiga is no different. For some the Amiga is the games. Others love it for its excellent sound capabilities, while some love it for the ease of coding (the 68k is the most friendly cpu ever invented in my book). And perhaps all of us love the Amiga for the memories we have. A harmless yet valuable nostalgia of better times.

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Amiga OS 3.1 pimped up, running on Amibian [native] Raspberry PI 3b

But for me the love was always the OS itself. The architecture of Amiga OS is so elegant and dare I say, pure, compared to other systems. And I’m comparing against both legacy and contemporary systems here. Microsoft Windows (WinAPI) comes close, but the sheer brilliance of Amiga OS is yet to be rivaled.

We are talking about a design that delivers a multimedia driven, window based desktop 10 years before the competition. A desktop that would thrive in as little as 512 kb of ram, with fast and reliable pre-emptive multitasking.

I don’t think people realize or understand the true value of Amiga OS. It’s not in the games (although games is definitively a huge part of the experience), the hardware or the programs. The reason people have been fighting bitterly over Amiga OS for a lifetime, is because the operating system architecture or “formula” is unmatched to this very day.

Can you imagine what a system that thrives under 512 KB would do to the desktop market? Or even better, what it could bring to the table for embedded and server technology?

And this is where my frustration soars up. Even though we have OS 4.1, we have been forced to idly stand by and watch, as mistake after mistake is being made. opportunities that are ripe for the taking (some of them literally placed on the doorstep of Hyperion), have been thrown by the wayside time and time again.

And they are not alone. Aros and Morphos has likewise missed a lot of opportunities. Both opportunities to generate income and secure development as well as embracing new technology. Although I must stress that I sympatize with Aros since they lack any official funding. Morphos is doing much better using a normal, commerical license.

Frustration, the mother of invention

When the Raspberry PI was first released I jumped of joy. Finally a SBC (single board computer) with enough power to run a light version of Amiga OS 4.1, with a price tag that everyone can live with. I rushed over to Hyperion to see if they had issued a statement about the PI, but nothing could be found. The AEON site was likewise empty.

The PI version 2 came and went, still no sign that Hyperion would capitalize on the situation. I expected them to issue a “Amiga OS 4.1 light” edition for ARM, which would put them on the map and help them establish a user base. Without a user base and fresh blood there is no chance in hell of selling next generation machines in large enough quantities to justify future development. But once again, opportunity after oppertunity came and went.

Sexy, fast and modern: Amiga OS 4.1

Sexy, fast and modern: Amiga OS 4.1 would do wonders on ARM

Faster and better suited SBC’s started to turn up in droves: The ODroid, Beaglebone black, The Tinkerboard, The Banana PI – and many, many others. When the SnapDragon IV CPU’s shipped on a $120 SBC, which is the same processor used by Samsung Galaxy 6S, I was sure Hyperion would wake up and bring Amiga OS to the masses. But not a word.

Instead we were told to wait for the Amiga x5000 which is based on PPC. I have no problem with PPC, it’s a great platform and packs a serious punch. But since PPC no longer sell to mainstream computer companies like it used to, the price penalty would be nothing short of astronomical. There is also the question of longevity and being able to maintain a PPC based system for the forseeable future. Where exactly is PPC in 15 years?

Note: One of the reasons PPC was selected has to do with coding infrastructure. PPC has an established standard, something ARM lacked at the time (this was first established for ARM in 2014). PPC also has an established set of development platforms that you can build on, with libraries and pre-fab modules (pre fabricated modules, think components that you can use to quickly build what you need) that have been polished for two decades now. A developer who knows PPC from the Amiga days will naturally feel more at home with PPC. But sadly PPC is the past and modern development takes place almost exclusively on ARM and x86. Even x86 is said to have an expiration date now.

The only group that genuinely tried to bring Amiga OS to ARM has been the Aros team. They got their system compiled, implemented some rudimentary drivers (information on this has been thin to say the least) and had it booting natively on the Raspberry PI 3b. Sadly they lacked a USB stack (remember I mentioned pre-fab modules above? Well, this is a typical example. PPC devtools ship with modules like this out of the box) so things like mouse, keyboard and external peripherals wouldn’t work.

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Aeros, the fastest Amiga you will ever play with. Running on the Raspberry PI 3b

And like always, which is the curse of Amiga, “something came up”, and the whole Raspberry PI / ARM initiative was left for dead. The details around this is sketchy, but the lead developer had a personal issue that forced him to set a new direction in life. And for some reason the other Aros developers have just continued with x86, even though a polished ARM version could have made them some money, and helped finance future development. It’s the same story, again and again.

But then something amazing happened! Out of the blue came Pascal Papara with a new take on Aros, namely AEROS. This is a distro after my own heart. Instead of wasting years trying to implement everything from scratch, Pascal took the Linux kernel and ran with it. So Aeros boots by virtue of the Linux Kernel, but jumps straight into Aros once the drivers has loaded. And the result? It is the fastest desktop you will ever experience on ARM. Seriously, it runs so fast and smooth on the Raspberry PI that you could easily mistake it for a $450 Intel i3.

Sadly Pascal has been more or less alone about this development. And truth be told he has molded it to suit his own needs rather than the consumer. Since his work includes a game machine and some Linux services, the whole Linux system is exposed to the Aros desktop. This is a huge mistake.

Using the Linux kernel to capitalize on the thousands of man hours invested in that, not to mention the linux driver database which is massive, is a great idea. It’s also the first thing that came into my mind when contemplating the issue.

But when running Aros on top of this, the Linux aspect of the system should be abstracted away. Much like what Apple did with Unix. You should hardly notice that Linux is there unless you open a shell and start to investigate. The Amiga filesystem should be the only filesystem you see when accessing things from the desktop, and a nice preferences option for showing / hiding mounted Linux drives.

My plans for an ARM based Amiga inspired OS

Building an OS is not a task for the faint of heart. Yes there is a lot of embedded / pre-fab based systems to pick from out there, but you also have to be sensible. You are not going to code a better kernel than Linus Torvalds, so instead of wasting years trying to catch up with something you cannot possibly catch up with – just grab the kernel and make it work for us.

The Linux kernel solves things such as process contexts, “userland” vs “kernel space” (giving the kernel the power to kill a task and reclaim resources), multitasking / threading, thread priorities, critical sections, mutexes and global event objects; it gives us IPC (inter process communication), disk IO, established and rock solid sound and graphics frameworks; and last but perhaps most important: free access to the millions of drivers in the Linux repository.

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Early Amibian.js login dialog

You would have to be certified insane to ignore the Linux Kernel, thinking you will somehow be the guy (or group) that can teach Linus Torvalds a lesson. This is a man who has been writing kernel’s for 20+ years, and he does nothing else. He is surrounded by a proverbial army of developers that code, test, refactor and strive to deliver optimal performance, safety and quality assurance. So sorry if I push your buttons here, but you would be a moron to take him on. Instead, absorb the kernel and gain access to the benefits it has given Linux (technically the kernel is “Linux”, the rest is GNU – but you get what I mean).

With the Linux kernel as a foundation, as much as 50% of the work involved in writing our OS is finished already. You don’t have to invent a driver API. You dont have to invent a new executable format (or write your own ELF parser if you stick with the Linux executable). You can use established compilers like GCC / Clang and Freepascal. And you can even cherry pick some low-level packages for your own native API (like SDL, OpenGL and things that would take years to finish).

But while we want to build our house on rock, we don’t want it to be yet another Linux distro. So with the kernel in place and a significant part of our work done for us, that is also where the similarities end.

The end product is Amiga OS, which means that we need compatibility with the original Amiga rom libraries (read: api). Had we started from scratch that would have been a tremendous effort, which is also why Aros is so important. Because Aros gives us a blueprint of how they have implemented these API’s.

But our main source of inspiration is not Aros, but Amithlon. What we want to do is naturally to pipe as much as we can from the Amiga API’s back to the Linux kernel. Things like device detection, memory allocation, file IO, pipes, networking — our library files will be more thin wrappers that expose Amiga compatible calls; methods that calls the Linux Kernel to do the job. So our Amiga library files will be proxy objects whenever possible.

AmithlonQEmu

Amithlon, decades ahead of it’s time

The hard work is when we get to the window manager, or Intuition. Here we can’t cheat by pushing things back to Linux. We don’t want to install X either (although we can render our system into the X framebuffer if we like), so we have to code a window manager. This is not as simple as it sounds, because our system must operate with multiple cores, be multi threaded by design and tap into the grand scheme of things. Things like messages (which is used by applications to respond to input) must be established, and all the event codes from the original Amiga OS must be replicated.

So this work wont be easy, but with the Linux kernel as a foundation – the hardest task of all is taken care of. The magic of a kernel is that of process management and task switching. This is about as hard-core as you can get. Without that you can almost forget the rest. But since we base our system on the Linux kernel, we can focus 100% on the real task – namely to deliver a modern Amiga experience, one that is platform independent (read: conforms to standard Linux and can thus be recompiled and run anywhere Linux can run), preserves as much of the initial formula as possible – and can be successfully maintained far into the future.

By pushing as much of our work as possible into user-space (the process space where ordinary programs run, the kernel runs outside this space and is thus unaffected when a program crashes) and adhering to the Linux kernel beneath the bonnet, we have created a system that can be re-compiled anywhere Linux is. And it can be done so without any change to our codebase. Linux takes care of things like drivers, OpenGL, Sound — and presents to us a clean API that is identical on every platform. It doesn’t matter if it’s ARM, PPC, 68k, x86 or MIPS. As long as we follow the standards we are home free.

Last words

I hope all of this clears up the confusion that has surrounded the subject this week. Again, the misunderstanding that led to some unfortunate posts has been resolved. So there is no negativity, no drama and we are all on the same page.

amidesk

Early Amibian.js prototype, running 68k in the browser via uae.js optimized

Just remember that I have set some restrictions for my involvement here. I sincerely hope Hyperion and the Aros development group can focus on ARM, because the community needs this. While the Raspberry PI might seem too small a form-factor to run Aros, projects like Aeros have proven just how effective the Amiga formula is. I’m sure Hyperion could find a powerful ARM SOC in the price range of $120 and sell a complete package with profit for around $200.

What the Amiga community needs now, is not expensive hardware. The userbase has to be expanded horizontally across platforms. Amiga OS / Aros has much to offer the embedded market which today is dominated by overly complex Linux libraries. The Amiga can grow laterally as a more user-friendly alternative, much like Android did for the mobile market. Once the platform is growing and established – then custom hardware could be introduced. But right now that is not what we need.

I also hope that the Aros team drops whatever they are working on, fork Pascal Paparas codebase, and spend a few weeks polishing the system. Abstract away the Linux foundation like Apple have done, get those sexy 32 bit OS4 icons (Note: The icons used by Amiga OS 4 is available for free download from the designer’s website) and a nice theme that looks similar to OS 4 (but not too similar). Get Lazarus (the freepascal IDE) going and ship the system with a ready to use Pascal, C/C++ and Basic development environments. Bring back the fun in computing! The code is already there, use it!

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Aeros interfaces directly with linux, I would propose a less direct approach

Just take something simple, like a compatible browser. It’s actually not that simple, both for reasons of complexity and how memory is handled by PPC. With a Linux foundation things like Chromium Embedded could be inked into the Amiga side of things and we would have a native, fast, established and up-to-date browser.

At the same time, since we have API level compatability, people can recompile their Aros and Morphos applications and they would run more or less unchanged.

I really hope that my little protest here, if nothing else, helps people realize that there are viable options readily at hand. Commodore is not coming back, and the only future this platform has – is the one we make. So people have to ask themselves how much they want a future.

If the OS gains momentum then there will be grounds for investors to look at custom hardware. They can then choose off the shelves parts that are inexpensive to cover the normal functionality you expect in a modern computer – which more resources can go into custom hardware that sets the system apart. But we cant start there. It has to be built up brick by brich, standing on the shoulders of giants.

OK, rant over 🙂

Facebook, this must change

March 14, 2018 2 comments

Facebook has grown to be more than just a social platform where friends meet. You have groups and communities of every conceivable type, where people of every convictions engage and debate anything you can think of. Groups where people have opinions, are passionate and put ideas to the test.

It has been grand, but lately a negative trend (or technique) has evolved; and sadly Facebook don’t seem to get the full scope of its impact. For them that is.

Childish games

College student looks at sign on classroom door: Blame Shifting 101.

We did this as kids!

It reminds me of behaviour you could see in highschool, where someone would do something illegal, and then point the finger at those who tried to stop the act (also known as blame shifting). Today this has evolved into a type of “revenge” tactics, where individuals who lose an argument (regardless of what it may be) get back at others by falsely reporting them.

At first glance this looks silly enough. Go ahead and report me, I have nothing to hide right? Well it would be silly if Facebook actually took such complaints serious and actually looked at what was written with human eyes. Sadly they don’t, and without any consequences involved for people who maliciously report users out of sheer spite – the stage is set of the worst of trolls to do what they do best: cause mischief and mayhem for upstanding members.

This has reached such heights that we now see the proverbial “drive-by” reporting of people they don’t like or disagree with (especially in political and economic forums) and it goes un-checked by Facebook.

This is a very negative trend for the platform and has already caused considerable damage; To Facebook that is. Why? Well people just move on when the format puts trolls, group campers and reporting snipers (call them what you will) at equal odds with honest, responsible adults that engage in debate.

Group campers and trolls

I was just informed that I had been “reported” and consequently expelled for 7 days due to a violation of terms. I was quite shocked to read this, so I took the time to go through these terms. I was at a complete loss of which of their standards I had violated. And as it turned out, I had broken none of them. I would never dream of posting pornography, I have not made racist remarks (quite the opposite! In 2017 I kicked a total of 46 members from Delphi Developer for rubbish like that), nor am I a member of the anti-christ movement and I don’t go around looking for fights either.

What I had done however, was to catch two members of a group using fake profiles. And in debate with one of these, telling the individual that his trolling the group is neither welcome nor decent – his revenge was to report me (!).

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Not all sayings translate well to English

What really surprised me was how Facebook seem to take things at face value. There is no way that a human being could be behind such a ruling; at least not people fluent in Norwegian.

First they seem to employ a simple word check, no doubt looking for curse and swear items (using google translate or some other lookup service). If you pass that, they seem to check for references to a person or individual in conjunction with negative phrasing. Which, let’s be honest, is a somewhat grey area considering their services covers a whole planet with hundreds of cultures.

In this case the only conceivable negative phrase in my post was “Go troll under a bridge“, which is not an insult but an expression with roots in Norwegian folklore. In Norwegian lore trolls typically lived either up in the mountains or under a bridge. And you had to pay the troll not to eat you (a somewhat fitting description considering the situation).

This goes to character. Namely when the person (or fake profile) here did nothing but post statements designed cause problems for other members, then that is the very definition of a net-troll. So telling such an individual to troll under a bridge is the same as saying “stop it and get out” [loosely translated]. I could have just banned him, but I tend to give people the benefit of the doubt.

Facebook as a viable platform

I hope Facebook wakes up, because this type of “tactics” has grown and is being used more and more. And if you score a single point on the above criteria, regardless if the person who reported the incident is also the source — you are just banned for 7 days. Surely, the act of reporting someone who has not violated the terms should carry equal weight? But that is where Facebook just hides behind a wall of Q&A without any opportunity for actual dialog. They don’t seem to care if the report was false or a pure act of revenge – they just blindly accept it and moves on.

The result of this? Well, it’s sort of self-evident isn’t it? People will have to deploy the same tactics in order to survive and protect themselves from such attacks; and voila – you have the extreme rise of fake profiles which has just exploded on Facebook.

troll_platform

Viable platform? I am really starting to question this

Well im not going to create a false profile, because I have some terms of my own; commonly known as “principles“. I run several large groups on Facebook and have been nothing but an asset to their growth. And if they want to lose 7 days of high activity, that is their loss. I am also starting to question if FB is a viable platform at all when a guy running 3 large groups and two businesses there (with a 15 year membership history) can be so easily barred by a fake profile.

But sadly I will stop talking to people who get into arguments and just report + kick them from whatever group they are in. Its sad, but those are the results of the absolutely absurd practices of Facebook. So until their filters employ some logic to them, that’s the way things are.

You cannot run a business on kindergarten rules

I sincerely hope you put some effort and thought into how to solve problems like these. For example, scanning the past 3 notes posted by the reporter to see if there is grounds to ignore the report – or in fact ban the reporter for creating the situation to begin with.

All of this can be solved with a simple strike and value system. If you falsely report someone that’s a strike. If you camp in a group and get multiple reports (within a time-frame), you get automatically banned from that group. If you persistently ban someone (a.k.a bullying) that is another strike. Enough strikes and you get a 7 day warning (or harder depending on the violation).

It wouldn’t require much work to create a system where long-standing, responsible members who benefit the platform – are recognized over trolls that do nothing but ruin this. Seriously. I cannot believe that a planet wide social platform with millions of users, are deploying social rules from the late bronze age.

My thoughts go to the Monty Python sketch “She’s a witch!” set in the darkness of medieval europe. If someone says you are a witch, well then you must be one (sigh). Way to go Facebook, just way to go.

Oh well, I meant to brush up on my Google+ work anyways 🙂