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Delphi Dying? Think again, Tiobe

March 8, 2020 9 comments

At the beginning of last week, Tiobe once again threw a punch at Object Pascal. Playing the whole “Delphi is dying” tune, while focusing on outdated and quite frankly irrelevant episodes from the past. Hoping no doubt, to leave the reader with an impression that Delphi is stuck in the 90s.

This is the same pattern we often see whenever Delphi or Object Pascal in general experience significant growth; or to be blunt, when the author cannot be bothered to think independently, but simply parrot hearsay and misinformation on autopilot.

It is lame, superficial and Tiobe’s biggest mistake to date.

Tiobe

Guess “alternative news” is no longer limited to individuals like Alex Jones

Just to underline the problem areas here. The ranking is based on their internal system (there is no standard for how to rank popularity), and while I have issues with how they build up their score, it’s ultimately the March editorial text that has caused irritation and shock. You don’t declare a language as dead when there are over 10 million developers using it. This type of editorial could have very real consequences – which in turn brings us to their ranking system and how they arrived at their conclusions.

I would have understood their statement if it was issued between 2007 and 2010, because Delphi was at that time transitioning between Borland and Embarcadero. But to issue something like this in 2020? After a decade worth of restoration, optimization, modernization and above all – forging a thriving community that goes from victory to victory month after month, year after year? It makes absolutely no sense.

Significant growth

In 2018 there were roughly six million Delphi developers (I worked at Embarcadero at the time), with a total estimate of ten million Object Pascal developers worldwide when counting all alternative compilers, dialects and indeed – known piracy issues.

“Tiobe failed stupendously in their data mining operation, they seem to be oblivious regarding the demographic in which the language is used”

Since that time Delphi has made strides into the universities in Scandinavia, South-America and the Middle-East. Turkey recently announced their dedication to native and archetypal software development with Delphi (provided free for students), which adds a whopping one million students to the already large body of users.

Embarcadero has slowly but steadily rebuilt much of the infrastructure that existed under Borland. From professional training at Embarcadero Academy, to entry level training at LearnDelphi.org. The Idera community pages likewise produce a large body of articles on a weekly basis. Comparing the Delphi and C++Builder ecosystem today with it’s tragic state back in 2010, is like day and night.

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Training is available for both Enterprise level developers and students alike

With so much positive happening in the world of Object Pascal, Tiobe’s article comes across as a grave, intentional misrepresentation at worst, or an intellectual emergency at best. It is completely out of place and carries the tell-tell signs of an echo chamber.

Tiobe has lost all credibility

I have to be honest. I have never taken Tiobe that serious, because they have made to many mistakes in the past to have any form of credibility when it comes to Delphi and Object Pascal as a language. And when I say mistakes, I mean monumental blunders that just annihilate all possibility that they treat languages on equal footing.

“not only have Tiobe failed in their indexing, they have completely and utterly misunderstood the demographic in which the language is used”

If we go back a decade, Tiobe actually based their numbers on the keyword “Pascal”. In other words they excluded not just Delphi commits to GitHub, BitBucket and similar services – they also managed to exclude Freepascal and every subsequent dialect that signify Object Pascal as a whole. So for quite some time their entire statistics was based on the off chance that people typed “Pascal” in their project or commit entries.

To make matters worse, their search tech was not smart enough to recognize “Pascal” in composite words. So if you wrote “ObjectPascal” in a single word, the commit was excluded; As was “Freepascal”, “Smartpascal”, “Oxygenepascal” and variations using a hyphen (and the same for abbreviations).

Developers also use the term Lazarus and FPC interchangeably since Lazarus typically means people use the LCL, the visual framework used to write desktop applications with Freepascal. So while Freepascal has nothing to do with Delphi in terms of intellectual property, the two compilers are used by the community as a whole.

But let’s look at why Tiobe’s indexing fails for Delphi. Just what are they doing wrong?

  • Delphi has been around for 25 years, and it’s roots stretch back to the birth of C. Using Stack Overflow as an indicator for popularity is ludacris, since the majority of errors and problems have been largely ironed out in the past, leaving only extremely advanced and rare topics. If problems is the criteria, then I guess that explains why C# and Java soars in the ranking.
  • Nobody searches google for “Delphi programming”. You search for explicit topics like composite polygon clipping with GDI+ and then add “delphi” to limit the search to said language. Just like C/C++, Object Pascal is an archetypal language. It stretches from kernel work with inline assembly, to cloud services and HTML5 rendering. So the topics people search for are usually straight out of the operating-system strata.
  • Delphi developers communicate in dedicated groups, such as Delphi Developer on Facebook. There is also a thriving community on the Delphi Praxis forums, not to mention the Freepascal forums. None of which seem to be included in Tiobe’s activity statistics.
  • Object Pascal has several frameworks and run-time libraries. Delphi ships with two:
  • Freepascal operates with its own, open-source variation called the LCL
  • Freepascal also targets WebAssembly and JavaScript and have variations of the LCL adapted those targets
  • And then there is third party, commercial alternatives that covers HTML5/JS like TMS WebCore, Smart Pascal, Oxygene Pascal and the upcoming Quartex Pascal. Around these runtime libraries (VCL, FMX and LCL) there are thousands of libraries, components and frameworks, large and small, that don’t necessarily put  “Delphi” or “Object Pascal” in their metadata.
  • Tiobe also fails to include feeds like BeginEnd.net or DelphiFeeds, which syndicate on average 3000 unique blog-posts a year, representing a consistent and very much alive stream of information and content.

Delphi and Freepascal, which represents the most widely used compilers, are predominantly used to write commercial, closed source products. Which by consequence means that code and the activity involved is not public. For Tiobe to so utterly misunderstand the demographic for Object Pascal in general, is quite frankly outrageous. If you are going to rank a language that involves millions of users -then at least have the decency of investigating the communities it involves.

Excluding the factors I have outlined above, makes as much sense as excluding mono from C#.

Incompetence or plain ignorance?

It was only after an avalanche of complaints in 2014, orchestrated by yours truly, where members of the Delphi Developer group on Facebook sent complaints en-mass to Tiobe that they addressed the use of “Pascal” to represent Delphi and associated dialects. Yet for all the complaints, outlined in letters that no sentient human being could misunderstand – all Tiobe managed to do was to add “Object Pascal” to their list. Which, believe it or not, was unfamiliar to them.

It’s funny because it’s true

But do you think they bothered to do it right? Afraid not. Instead of aggregating all of the dialects, frameworks and variations of names under a single banner, they still to this day operate with two very specific search elements, namely “Delphi” or “Object Pascal”.

I sure hope the dairy industry doesn’t hire Tiobe to do statistics on milk, because if their coverage of Object Pascal is anything to go by, they will be ranking by yogurt.

No updates since 2018? Really Tiobe?

When a global Index service like Tiobe manage to write, and I quote:

However, the latest Delphi release is from 2018” -Source: Tiobe, March report

You really have to ponder if human beings are involved in their business at all. I’m not expecting much, honestly, but I do expect them to interact with the community they supposedly track and build a statistic on. Have they visited Delphi Developer and talked to the admins about growth numbers? Have they talked to Embarcadero to get some figures and coverage there? Did they contact the Freepascal community to get some download statistics from them?

Delphi 10.3 was released on november 21st 2019. The version that Tiobe seem to think is the last update, is in fact the last release with a city name (which was launched in 2018). Since then there have been three successive, regular updates; most developers are now using version 10.3.3. With 10.3.4 about to be released. This just underlines how oblivious Tiobe is to our part of the industry.

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Modern Delphi is used by millions of professional developers globally

Delphi and Freepascal is different in more ways than one, but beyond language compatibility there is one aspect that is quintessential for them both; namely their role in the commercial sector. Where other languages, like C/C++ or (for example) JavaScript see a lot of open-source activity, especially with regards to Linux and Node.js – Delphi and Freepascal are predominantly used to write high-quality, commercial, closed source business applications. In other words, the vast majority of code produced by the millions of Object Pascal developers around the world – is never publicly committed to GitHub or BitBucket.

So not only have Tiobe failed stupendously in their data mining operation, they seem oblivious to the demographic in which the language is used.

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The selection of books, video tutorials and coding material for Delphi is recovering at a rapid pace. And much like C/C++ there are classic books on Amazon that are just as relevant today as they were 10 years ago. Thankfully Delphi don’t suffer the “learn Delphi in 2 weeks” style books, because any developer worth his salt knows that such books are for the gullible and naive.

Developers use Delphi and Freepascal to deliver rock solid, data driven services; services that is expected to run 24/7 with zero downtime, processing millions of transactions. Delphi is used to write medical software that manages networks of hospitals, with tens of thousands of patients. Delphi is used by banks to power their ATM machines, and Delphi is used to do the heavy lifting in thousands of POS (point of sale) terminals across Europe. Terminals that don’t have time to wait for a garbage collector to kick in, only to cause catastrophic CPU spikes (I won’t mention names, but attempting to switch to C# was a disaster for one of the biggest POS terminal suppliers in Europe).

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Delphi represents the back-bone of the medical software industry in Scandinavia and Europe at large. Many have tried to replace Delphi, but end up with expensive lessons in why archetypal languages are indeed called archetypal.

Object Pascal is used by governments, fortune 500 companies and the guy with a million dollar idea working out of his parents garage; It is used to write cloud accounting software, invoicing systems and medical journaling; It is used by the music industry and graphical design. There are large and extremely successful products out there that don’t advertise that it’s written in Delphi (just like you don’t stamp “made with C++” on a piece of software). You would be surprised!

Object Pascal it’s used by developers who value speed, security, creative freedom and the benefit of a mature feature matrix that only C/C++ and Object Pascal brings. C is by definition three years older than Pascal, but these two archetypal languages have evolved side by side.

There is a reason these two languages represented the university curriculum for close to two decades; further still if we include Turbo Pascal. And Delphi is once again returning home to academia. To the applause of teachers who were forced to teach Java, and hated every minute of it (I helped setup two universities with Delphi in Norway, so I have some first hand accounts in the matter).

Reflections

Since Delphi is growing aggressively these days, Embarcadero is making waves. A few months back we saw how a well known team of C# influencers took a stab at Delphi (and me in particular, no doubt because I have been so outspoken). And as Delphi now returns to academia – Tiobe is demonstrating a bias that leaves little to the imagination. Especially when you know their numbers account for nothing and are bordering on fiction.

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If I didn’t know better, I would say someone is worried. And it’s not the Delphi and Freepascal communities. Modern Delphi is a power-house for software development, and it has the potential to disrupt and restore the devtool market.

There is a lot of money involved, so I am not surprised we are seeing a string of attempts at undermining the importance of Object Pascal. I had hoped Tiobe would adopt a higher standard though.

Then again, the ship of credibility sailed when they couldn’t tell Turbo Pascal from Object Pascal.

Nodebuilder, QTX and the release of my brand new social platform

January 2, 2020 9 comments

First, let me wish everyone a wonderful new year! With xmas and the silly season firmly behind us, and my batteries recharged – I feel my coding fingers itch to get started again.

2019 was a very busy year for me. Exhausting even. I have juggled both a full time job, kids and family, as well as our community project, Quartex Media Desktop. And since that project has grown considerably, I had to stop and work on the tooling. Which is what NodeBuilder is all about.

I have also released my own social media platform (see further down). This was initially scheduled for Q4 2020, but Facebook pissed me off something insanely, so I set it up in december instead.

NodeBuilder

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For those of you that read my blog you probably remember the message system I made for the Quartex Desktop, called Ragnarok? This is a system for dealing with message dispatching and RPC, except that the handling is decoupled from the transport medium. In other words, it doesnt care how you deliver a message (WebSocket, UDP, REST), but rather takes care of serialization, binary data and security.

All the back-end services that make up the desktop system, are constructed around Ragnarok. So each service exposes a set of methods that the core can call, much like a normal RPC / SOAP service would. Each method is represented by a request and response object, which Ragnarok serialize to a JSON message envelope.

In our current model I use WebSocket, which is a full duplex, long-term connection (to avoid overhead of having to connect and perform a handshake for each call). But there is nothing in the way of implementing a REST transport layer (UDP is already supported, it’s used by the Zero-Config system. The services automatically find each other and register, as long as they are connected to the same router or switch). For the public service I think REST makes more sense, since it will better utilize the software clustering that node.js offers.

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Node Builder is a relatively simple service designer, but highly effective for our needs

 

Now for small services that expose just a handful of methods (like our chat service), writing the message classes manually is not really a problem. But the moment you start having 20 or 30 methods – and need to implement up to 60 message classes manually – this approach quickly becomes unmanageable and prone to errors. So I simply had to stop before xmas and work on our service designer. That way we can generate the boilerplate code in seconds rather than days and weeks.

While I dont have time to evolve this software beyond that of a simple service designer (well, I kinda did already), I have no problem seeing this system as a beginning of a wonderful, universal service authoring system. One that includes coding, libraries and the full scope of the QTX runtime-library.

In fact, most of the needed parts are in the codebase already, but not everything has been activated. I don’t have time to build both a native development system AND the development system for the desktop.

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NodeBuilder already have a fully functional form designer and code editor, but it is dormant for now due to time restrictions. Quartex Media Desktop comes first

But right now, we have bigger fish to fry.

Quartex Media Desktop

We have made tremendous progress on our universal desktop environment, to the point where the baseline services are very close to completion. A month should be enough to finish this unless something unforeseen comes up.

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Quartex Media Desktop provides an ecosystem for advanced web applications

You have to factor in that, this project has only had weekends and the odd after work hours allocated for it. So even though we have been developing this for 12 months, the actual amount of days is roughly half of that.

So all things considered I think we have done a massive amount of code in such a short time. Even simple 2d games usually take 2 years of daily development, and that includes a team of at least 5 people! Im a single developer working in my spare time.

So what exactly is left?

The last thing we did before xmas was upon us, was to throw out the last remnants of Smart Mobile Studio code. The back-end services are now completely implemented in our own QTX runtime-library, which has been written from scratch. There is not a line of code from Smart Mobile Studio in QTX, which means we no longer have to care what that system does or where it goes.

To sum up:

  • Push all file handling code out of the core
  • Implement file-handling as it’s own service

Those two steps might seem simple enough, but you have to remember that the older code was based on the Linux path system, and was read-only.

So when pushing that code out of the core, we also have to add all the functionality that was never implemented in our prototype.

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Each class actually represents a separate “mini” program, and there are still many more methods to go before we can put this service into production.

Since Javascript does not support threads, each method needs to be implemented as a separate program. So when a method is called, the file/task manager literally spawns a new process just for that task. And the result is swiftly returned back to the caller in async manner.

So what is ultimately simple, becomes more elaborate if you want to do it right. This is the price we pay for universality and a cluster enabled service-stack.

This is also why I have put the service development on pause until we have finished the NodeBuilder tooling. And I did this because I know by experience that the moment the baseline is ready, both myself and users of the system is going to go “oh we need this, and that and those”. Being able to quickly design and auto-generate all the boilerplate code will save us months of work. So I would rather spend a couple of weeks on NodeBuilder than wasting months having to manually write all that boilerplate code down the line.

What about the QTX runtime-library?

Writing an RTL from scratch was not something I could have anticipated before we started this project. But thankfully the worst part of this job is already finished.

The RTL is divided into two parts:

  • Non Visual code. Classes and methods that makes QTX an RTL
  • Visual code. Custom Controls + standard controls (buttons, lists etc)
  • Visual designer

As you can see, the non-visual aspect of the system is finished and working beautifully. It’s a lot faster than the code I wrote for Smart Mobile Studio (roughly twice as fast on average). I also implemented a full visual designer, both as a Delphi visual component and QTX visual component.

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Quartex Media Desktop makes running on several machines [cluster] easy and seamless

So fundamental visual classes like TCustomControl is already there. What I haven’t had time to finish are the standard-controls, like TButton, TListBox, TEdit and those type of visual components. That will be added after the release of QTX, at which point we throw out the absolute last remnants of Smart Mobile Studio from the client (HTML5 part) software too.

Why is the QTX Runtime-Library important again?

When the desktop is out the door, the true work begins! The desktop has several roles to play, but the most important aspect of the desktop – is to provide an ecosystem capable of hosting web based applications. Offering features and methods traditionally only found in Windows, Linux or OS X. It truly is a complete cloud system that can scale from a single affordable SBC (single board computer), to a high-end cluster of powerful servers.

Clustering and writing distributed applications has always been difficult, but Quartex Media Desktop makes it simple. It is no more difficult for a user to work on a clustered system, as it is to work on a normal, single OS. The difficult part has already been taken care of, and as long as people follow the rules, there will be no issues beyond ordinary maintenance.

And the first commercial application to come out of Quartex Components, is Cloud Forge, which is the development system for the platform. It has the same role as Visual Studio for Windows, or X Code for Apple OS X.

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The Quartex Media Desktop Cluster cube. A $400 super computer

I have prepared 3 compilers for the system already. First there is C/C++ courtesy of Clang. So C developers will be able to jump in and get productive immediately. The second compiler is freepascal, or more precise pas2js, which allows you to compile ordinary freepascal code (which is highly Delphi compatible) to both JavaScript and WebAssembly.

And last but not least, there is my fork of DWScript, which is the same compiler that Smart Mobile Studio uses. Except that my fork is based on the absolute latest version, and i have modified it heavily to better match special features in QTX. So right out of the door CloudForge will have C/C++, two Object Pascal compilers, and vanilla Javascript and typescript. TypeScript also has its own WebAssembly compiler, so doing hard-core development directly in a browser or HTML5 viewport is where we are headed.

Once the IDE is finished I can finally, finally continue on the LDEF bytecode runtime, which will be used in my BlitzBasic port and ultimately replace both clang, freepascal and DWScript. As a bonus it will emit native code for a variety of systems, including x86, ARM, 68k [including 68080] and PPC.

This might sound incredibly ambitious, if not impossible. But what I’m ultimately doing here -is moving existing code that I already have into a new paradigm.

The beauty of object pascal is the sheer size and volume of available components and code. Some refactoring must be done due to the async nature of JS, but when needed we fall back on WebAssembly via Freepascal (WASM executes linear, just like ordinary native code does).

A brand new social platform

During december Facebook royally pissed me off. I cannot underline enough how much i loath A.I censorship, and the mistakes that A.I does – in which you are utterly powerless to complain or be heard by a human being. In my case i posted a gif from their own mobile application, of a female body builder that did push-ups while doing hand-stands. In other words, a completely harmless gif with strength as the punchline. The A.I was not able to distinguish between a leotard and bare-skin, and just like that i was muted for over a week. No human being would make such a ruling. As an admin of a fairly large set of groups, there are many cases where bans are the result. Disgruntled members that acts out of revenge and report technical posts about coding as porn or offensive. Again, you are helpless because there are nobody you can talk to about resolving the issue. And this time I had enough.

It was always planned that we would launch our own social media platform, an alternative to Facebook aimed at adult geeks rather than kids (Facebook operates with an age limit of 12 years). So instead of waiting I rushed out and set up a brand new social network. One where those banale restrictions Facebook has conditioned us with, does not apply.

Just to underline, this is not some simple and small web forum. This is more or less a carbon copy of Facebook the way it used to be 8-9 years ago. So instead of having a single group on facebook, we can now have as many groups as we like, on a platform that looks more or less identical to Facebook – but under our control and human rules.

AD1

Amigadisrupt.com is a brand new social media platform for geeks

You can visit the site right now at https://www.amigadisrupt.com. Obviously the major content on the platform right now is dominated by retro computing – but groups like Delphi Developer and FPC developer has already been setup and are in use. But if you are expecting thousands of active users, that will take time. We are now closing in on 250 active users which is pretty good for such a short period of time. I dont want a platform anywhere near as big as FB. The goal is to get 10k users and have a stable community of coders, retro geeks, builders and creative individuals.

AD (Amiga Disrupt) will be a standard application that comes with Quartex Media Desktop. This is the beauty of web technology, in that it can unify different resources under one roof. And we will have our cake and eat it come hell or high water.

Disclaimer: Amiga Disrupt has a lower age limit of 18 years. This is a platform meant for adults. Which means there will be profanity, jokes that would get you banned on Facebook and content that is not meant for kids. This is hacker-land, and political correctness is considered toilet paper. So if you need social toffery like FB and Twitter deals with, you will be kicked by one of the admins.

After you sign up your feed will be completely empty. Here is how to get it started. And feel free to add me to your friends-list!thumb

Quartex “Cloud Ripper” hardware

November 10, 2019 Leave a comment

For close to a year now I have been busy on a very exciting project, namely my own cloud system. While I have written about this project quite a bit these past months, mostly focusing on the software aspect, not much has been said about that hardware.

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Quartex “Cloud Ripper” running neatly on my home-office desk

So let’s have a look at Cloud Ripper, the official hardware setup for Quartex Media Desktop.

Tiny footprint, maximum power

Despite its complexity, the Quartex Media Desktop architecture is surprisingly lightweight. The services that makes up the baseline system (read: essential services) barely consume 40 megabytes of ram per instance (!). And while there is a lot of activity going on between these services -most of that activity is message-dispatching. Sending messages costs practically nothing in cpu and network terms. This will naturally change the moment you run your cloud as a public service, or setup the system in an office environment for a team. The more users, the more signals are shipped between the processes – but with the exception of reading and writing large files, messages are delivered practically instantaneous and hardly use CPU time.

CloudRipper

Quartex Media Desktop is based on a clustered micro-service architecture

One of the reasons I compile my code to JavaScript (Quartex Media Desktop is written from the ground up in Object Pascal, which is compiled to JavaScript) has to do with the speed and universality of node.js services. As you might know, Node.js is powered by the Google V8 runtime engine, which means the code is first converted to bytecodes, and further compiled into highly optimized machine-code [courtesy of llvm]. When coded right, such Javascript based services execute just as fast as those implemented in a native language. There simply are no perks to be gained from using a native language for this type of work. There are however plenty of perks from using Node.js as a service-host:

  • Node.js delivers the exact same behavior no matter what hardware or operating-system you are booting up from. In our case we use a minimal Linux setup with just enough infrastructure to run our services. But you can use any OS that supports Node.js. I actually have it installed on my Android based Smart-TV (!)
  • We can literally copy our services between different machines and operating systems without recompiling a line of code. So we don’t need to maintain several versions of the same software for different systems.
  • We can generate scripts “on the fly”, physically ship the code over the network, and execute it on any of the machines in our cluster. While possible to do with native code, it’s not very practical and would raise some major security concerns.
  • Node.js supports WebAssembly, you can use the Elements Compiler from RemObjects to write service modules that executes blazingly fast yet remain platform and chipset independent.

The Cloud-Ripper cube

The principal design goal when I started the project, was that it should be a distributed system. This means that instead of having one large-service that does everything (read: a typical “native” monolithic design), we instead operate with a microservice cluster design. Services that run on separate SBC’s (single board computers). The idea here is to spread the payload over multiple mico-computers that combined becomes more than the sum of their parts.

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Cloud Ripper – Based on the Pico 5H case and fitted with 5 x ODroid XU4 SBC’s

So instead of buying a single, dedicated x86 PC to host Quartex Media Desktop, you can instead buy cheap, off-the-shelves, easily available single-board computers and daisy chain them together. So instead of spending $800 (just to pin a number) on x86 hardware, you can pick up $400 worth of cheap ARM boards and get better network throughput and identical processing power (*). In fact, since Node.js is universal you can mix and match between x86, ARM, Mips and PPC as you see fit. Got an older PPC Mac-Mini collecting dust? Install Linux on it and get a few extra years out of these old gems.

(*) A single XU4 is hopelessly underpowered compared to an Intel i5 or i7 based PC. But in a cluster design there are more factors than just raw computational power. Each board has 8 CPU cores, bringing the total number of cores to 40. You also get 5 ARM Mali-T628 MP6 GPUs running at 533MHz. Only one of these will be used to render the HTML5 display, leaving 4 GPUs available for video processing, machine learning or compute tasks. Obviously these GPUs won’t hold a candle to even a mid-range graphics card, but the fact that we can use these chips for audio, video and computation tasks makes the system incredibly versatile.

Another design goal was to implement a UDP based Zero-Configuration mechanism. This means that the services will find and register with the core (read: master service) automatically, providing the machines are all connected to the same router or switch.

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Put together your own supercomputer for less than $500

The first “official” hardware setup is a cluster based on 5 cheap ARM boards; namely the ODroid XU4. The entire setup fits inside a Pico Cube, which is a special case designed to house this particular model of single board computers. Pico offers several different designs, ranging from 3 boards to a 20 board super-cluster. You are not limited ODroid XU4 boards if you prefer something else. I picked the XU4 boards because they represent the lowest possible specs you can run the Quartex Media Desktop on. While the services themselves require very little, the master board (the board that runs the QTXCore.js service) is also in charge of rendering the HTML5 display. And having tested a plethora of boards, the ODroid XU4 was the only model that could render the desktop properly (at that low a price range).

Note: If you are thinking about using a Raspberry PI 3B (or older) as the master SBC, you can pretty much forget it. The media desktop is a piece of very complex HTML5, and anything below an ODroid XU4 will only give you a terrible experience (!). You can use smaller boards as slaves, meaning that they can host one of the services, but the master should preferably be an ODroid XU4 or better. The ODroid N2 [with 4Gb Ram] is a much better candidate than a Raspberry PI v4. A Jetson Nano is an even better option due to its extremely powerful GPU.

Booting into the desktop

One of the things that confuse people when they read about the desktop project, is how it’s possible to boot into the desktop itself and use Quartex Media Desktop as a ChromeOS alternative?

How can a “cloud platform” be used as a desktop alternative? Don’t you need access to the internet at all times? If it’s a server based system, how then can we boot into it? Don’t we need a second PC with a browser to show the desktop?

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Accessing the desktop like a “web-page” from a normal Linux setup

To make a long story short: the “master” in our cluster architecture (read: the single-board computer defined as the boss) is setup to boot into a Chrome browser display under “kiosk mode”. When you start Chrome in kiosk mode, this removes all traces of the ordinary browser experience. There will be no toolbars, no URL field, no keyboard shortcuts, no right-click popup menus etc. It simply starts in full-screen and whatever HTML5 you load, has complete control over the display.

What I have done, is to to setup a minimal Linux boot sequence. It contains just enough Linux to run Chrome. So it has all the drivers etc. for the device, but instead of starting the ordinary Linux Desktop (X or Wayland) -we instead start Chrome in kiosk mode.

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Booting into the same desktop through Chrome in Kiosk Mode. In this mode, no Linux desktop is required. The Linux boot sequence is altered to jump straight into Chrome

Chrome is started to load from 127.0.0.1 (this is a special address that always means “this machine”), which is where our QTXCore.js service resides that has it’s own HTTP/S and Websocket servers. The client (HTML5 part) is loaded in under a second from the core — and the experience is more or less identical to starting your ChromeBook or NAS box. Most modern NAS (network active storage) devices are much more than a file-server today. NAS boxes like those from Asustor Inc have HDMI out, ships with a remote control, and are designed to act as a media center. So you connect the NAS directly to your TV, and can watch movies and listen to music without any manual conversion etc.

In short, you can setup Quartex Media Desktop to do the exact same thing as ChromeOS does, booting straight into the web based desktop environment. The same desktop environment that is available over the network. So you are not limited to visiting your Cloud-Ripper machine via a browser from another computer; nor are you limited to just  using a dedicated machine. You can setup the system as you see fit.

Why should I assemble a Cloud-Ripper?

Getting a Cloud-Ripper is not forced on anyone. You can put together whatever spare hardware you have (or just run it locally under Windows). Since the services are extremely lightweight, any x86 PC will do. If you invest in a ODroid N2 board ($80 range) then you can install all the services on that if you like. So if you have no interest in clustering or building your own supercomputer, then any PC, Laptop or IOT single-board computer(s) will do. Provided it yields more or equal power as the XU4 (!)

What you will experience with a dedicated cluster, regardless of putting the boards in a nice cube, is that you get excellent performance for very little money. It is quite amazing what $200 can buy you in 2019. And when you daisy chain 5 ODroid XU4 boards together on a switch, those 5 cheap boards will deliver the same serving power as an x86 setup costing twice as much.

Jetson-Nano_3QTR-Front_Left_trimmed

The NVidia Jetson Nano SBC, one of the fastest boards available at under $100

Pico is offering 3 different packages. The most expensive option is the pre-assembled cube. This is for some reason priced at $750 which is completely absurd. If you can operate a screwdriver, then you can assemble the cube yourself in less than an hour. So the starter-kit case which costs $259 is more than enough.

Next, you can buy the XU4 boards directly from Hardkernel for $40 a piece, which will set you back $200. If you order the Pico 5H case as a kit, that brings the sub-total up to $459. But that price-tag includes everything you need except sd-cards. So the kit contains power-supply, the electrical wiring, a fast gigabit ethernet switch [built-into the cube], active cooling, network cables and power cables. You don’t need more than 8Gb sd-cards, which costs practically nothing these days.

Note: The Quartex Media Desktop “file-service” should have a dedicated disk. I bought a 256Gb SSD disk with a USB 3.0 interface, but you can just use a vanilla USB stick to store user-account data + user files.

As a bonus, such a setup is easy to recycle should you want to do something else later. Perhaps you want to learn more about Kubernetes? What about a docker-swarm? A freepascal build-server perhaps? Why not install FreeNas, Plex, and a good backup solution? You can set this up as you can afford. If 5 x ODroid XU4 is too much, then get 3 of them instead + the Pico 3H case.

So should Quartex Media Desktop not be for you, or you want to do something else entirely — then having 5 ODroid XU4 boards around the house is not a bad thing.

Oh and if you want some serious firepower, then order the Pico 5H kit for the NVidia Jetson Nano boards. Graphically those boards are beyond any other SoC on the market (in it’s price range). But as a consequence the Jetson Nano starts at $99. So for a full kit you will end up with $500 for the boards alone. But man those are the proverbial Ferrari of IOT.

BTree for Delphi

July 7, 2019 4 comments
lookup

Click here to read

A few weeks back I posted an article on RemObjects blog regarding universal code, and how you with a little bit of care can write code that easily compiled with both Oxygene, Delphi and Freepascal. With emphasis on Oxygene.

The example I used was a BTree class that I originally ported from Delphi to Smart Pascal, and then finally to Oxygene to run under WebAssembly.

Long story short I was asked if I could port the code back to Delphi in its more or less universal form. Naturally there are small differences here and there, but nothing special that distinctly separates the Delphi version from Oxygene or Smart Pascal.

Why this version?

If you google BTree and Delphi you will find loads of implementations. They all operate more or less identical, using records and pointers for optimal speed. I decided to base my version on classes for convenience, but it shouldn’t be difficult to revert that to use records if you absolutely need it.

What I like about this BTree implementation is that it’s very functional. Its easy to traverse the nodes using the ForEach() method, you can add items using a number as an identifier, but it also supports string identifiers.

I also changed the typical data reference. The data each node represent is usually a pointer. I changed this to variant to make it more functional.

Well, here is the Delphi version as promised. Happy to help.

unit btree;

interface

uses
  System.Generics.Collections,
  System.Sysutils,
  System.Classes;

type

  // BTree leaf object
  TQTXBTreeNode = class(TObject)
  public
    Identifier: integer;
    Data:       variant;
    Left:       TQTXBTreeNode;
    Right:      TQTXBTreeNode;
  end;

  [Weak]
  TQTXBTreeProcessCB = reference to procedure (const Node: TQTXBTreeNode; var Cancel: boolean);

  EBTreeError = class(Exception);

  TQTXBTree = class(TObject)
  private
    FRoot:    TQTXBTreeNode;
    FCurrent: TQTXBTreeNode;
  protected
    function  GetEmpty: boolean;  virtual;
    function  GetPackedNodes: TList;

  public
    property  Root: TQTXBTreeNode read FRoot;
    property  Empty: boolean read GetEmpty;

    function  Add(const Ident: integer; const Data: variant): TQTXBTreeNode; overload; virtual;
    function  Add(const Ident: string; const Data: variant): TQTXBTreeNode; overload; virtual;

    function  Contains(const Ident: integer): boolean; overload; virtual;
    function  Contains(const Ident: string): boolean; overload; virtual;

    function  Remove(const Ident: integer): boolean; overload; virtual;
    function  Remove(const Ident: string): boolean; overload; virtual;

    function  Read(const Ident: integer): variant; overload; virtual;
    function  Read(const Ident: string): variant; overload; virtual;

    procedure Write(const Ident: string; const NewData: variant); overload; virtual;
    procedure Write(const Ident: integer; const NewData: variant); overload; virtual;

    procedure Clear; overload; virtual;
    procedure Clear(const Process: TQTXBTreeProcessCB); overload; virtual;

    function  ToDataArray: TList;
    function  Count: integer;

    procedure ForEach(const Process: TQTXBTreeProcessCB);

    destructor Destroy; override;
  end;

implementation

//#############################################################################
// TQTXBTree
//#############################################################################

destructor TQTXBTree.Destroy;
begin
  if FRoot  nil then
    Clear();
  inherited;
end;

procedure TQTXBTree.Clear;
var
  lTemp:  TList;
  x:  integer;
begin
  if FRoot  nil then
  begin
    // pack all nodes to a linear list
    lTemp := GetPackedNodes();

    try
      // release each node
      for x := 0 to ltemp.Count-1 do
      begin
        lTemp[x].Free;
      end;
    finally
      // dispose of list
      lTemp.Free;

      // reset pointers
      FCurrent := nil;
      FRoot := nil;
    end;
  end;
end;

procedure TQTXBTree.Clear(const Process: TQTXBTreeProcessCB);
begin
  ForEach(Process);
  Clear();
end;

function TQTXBTree.GetPackedNodes: TList;
var
  LData:  Tlist;
begin
  LData := TList.Create();
  ForEach( procedure (const Node: TQTXBTreeNode; var Cancel: boolean)
  begin
    LData.Add(Node);
    Cancel  := false;
  end);
  result := LData;
end;

function TQTXBTree.GetEmpty: boolean;
begin
  result := FRoot = nil;
end;

function TQTXBTree.Count: integer;
var
  LCount: integer;
begin
  ForEach( procedure (const Node: TQTXBTreeNode; var Cancel: boolean)
    begin
      inc(LCount);
      Cancel  := false;
    end);
  result := LCount;
end;

function TQTXBTree.ToDataArray: TList;
var
  Data: TList;
begin
  Data := TList.Create();

  ForEach( procedure (const Node: TQTXBTreeNode; var Cancel: boolean)
    begin
      Data.add(Node.data);
      Cancel := false;
    end);
  result := data;
end;

function TQTXBTree.Add(const Ident: string; const Data: variant): TQTXBTreeNode;
begin
  result := Add( Ident.GetHashCode(), Data);
end;

function TQTXBTree.Add(const Ident: integer; const Data: variant): TQTXBTreeNode;
var
  lNode:  TQTXBtreeNode;
begin
  LNode := TQTXBTreeNode.Create();
  LNode.Identifier := Ident;
  LNode.Data := data;

  if FRoot = nil then
    FRoot := LNode;

  FCurrent := FRoot;

  while true do
  begin
    if (Ident  FCurrent.Identifier) then
    begin
      if (FCurrent.right = nil) then
      begin
        FCurrent.right := LNode;
        break;
      end else
      FCurrent := FCurrent.right;
    end else
    break;
  end;
  result := LNode;
end;

function TQTXBTree.Read(const Ident: string): variant;
begin
  result := Read( Ident.GetHashCode() );
end;

function TQTXBTree.Read(const Ident: integer): variant;
begin
  FCurrent := FRoot;
  while FCurrent  nil do
  begin
    if (Ident  Fcurrent.Identifier) then
      FCurrent := FCurrent.Right
    else
    begin
      result := FCUrrent.Data;
      break;
    end
  end;
end;

procedure TQTXBTree.Write(const Ident: string; const NewData: variant);
begin
  Write( Ident.GetHashCode(), NewData);
end;

procedure TQTXBTree.Write(const Ident: integer; const NewData: variant);
begin
  FCurrent := FRoot;
  while (FCurrent  nil) do
  begin
    if (Ident  Fcurrent.Identifier) then
      FCurrent := FCurrent.Right
    else
    begin
      FCurrent.Data := NewData;
      break;
    end
  end;
end;

function  TQTXBTree.Contains(const Ident: string): boolean;
begin
  result := Contains( Ident.GetHashCode() );
end;

function TQTXBTree.Contains(const Ident: integer): boolean;
begin
  result := false;
  if FRoot  nil then
  begin
    FCurrent := FRoot;

    while ( (not Result) and (FCurrent  nil) ) do
    begin
      if (Ident  Fcurrent.Identifier) then
        FCurrent := FCurrent.Right
      else
      begin
        Result := true;
        break;
      end
    end;
  end;
end;

function TQTXBTree.Remove(const Ident: string): boolean;
begin
  result := Remove( Ident.GetHashCode() );
end;

function TQTXBTree.Remove(const Ident: integer): boolean;
var
  LFound: boolean;
  LParent: TQTXBTreeNode;
  LReplacement,
  LReplacementParent: TQTXBTreeNode;
  LChildCount: integer;
begin
  FCurrent := FRoot;
  LFound := false;
  LParent := nil;
  LReplacement := nil;
  LReplacementParent := nil;

  while (not LFound) and (FCurrent  nil) do
  begin
    if (Ident  FCurrent.Identifier) then
    begin
      LParent := FCurrent;
      FCurrent := FCurrent.right;
    end else
    LFound := true;

    if LFound then
    begin
      LChildCount := 0;

      if (FCurrent.left  nil) then
        inc(LChildCount);

      if (FCurrent.right  nil) then
        inc(LChildCount);

      if FCurrent = FRoot then
      begin
        case (LChildCOunt) of
        0:  begin
              FRoot := nil;
            end;
        1:  begin
              if FCurrent.right = nil then
                FRoot := FCurrent.left
              else
                FRoot :=FCurrent.Right;
            end;
        2:  begin
              LReplacement := FRoot.left;
              while (LReplacement.right  nil) do
              begin
                LReplacementParent := LReplacement;
                LReplacement := LReplacement.right;
              end;

            if (LReplacementParent  nil) then
            begin
              LReplacementParent.right := LReplacement.Left;
              LReplacement.right := FRoot.Right;
              LReplacement.left := FRoot.left;
            end else
            LReplacement.right := FRoot.right;
          end;
        end;

        FRoot := LReplacement;
      end else
      begin
        case LChildCount of
        0:  if (FCurrent.Identifier < LParent.Identifier) then
            Lparent.left  := nil else
            LParent.right := nil;
        1:  if (FCurrent.Identifier < LParent.Identifier) then
            begin
              if (FCurrent.Left = NIL) then
              LParent.left := FCurrent.Right else
              LParent.Left := FCurrent.Left;
            end else
            begin
              if (FCurrent.Left = NIL) then
              LParent.right := FCurrent.Right else
              LParent.right := FCurrent.Left;
            end;
        2:  begin
              LReplacement := FCurrent.left;
              LReplacementParent := FCurrent;

              while LReplacement.right  nil do
              begin
                LReplacementParent := LReplacement;
                LReplacement := LReplacement.right;
              end;
              LReplacementParent.right := LReplacement.left;

              LReplacement.right := FCurrent.right;
              LReplacement.left := FCurrent.left;

              if (FCurrent.Identifier < LParent.Identifier) then
                LParent.left := LReplacement
              else
                LParent.right := LReplacement;
            end;
          end;
        end;
      end;
  end;

  result := LFound;
end;

procedure TQTXBTree.ForEach(const Process: TQTXBTreeProcessCB);

  function ProcessNode(const Node: TQTXBTreeNode): boolean;
  begin
    if Node  nil then
    begin
      if Node.left  nil then
      begin
        result := ProcessNode(Node.left);
        if result then
          exit;
      end;

      Process(Node, result);
      if result then
        exit;

      if (Node.right  nil) then
      begin
        result := ProcessNode(Node.right);
        if result then
          exit;
      end;
    end;
  end;

begin
  ProcessNode(FRoot);
end;

end.

Calling node.js from Delphi

July 6, 2019 Leave a comment

We got a good question about how to start a node.js program from Delphi on our Facebook group today (third one in a week?). When you have been coding for years you often forget that things like this might not be immediately obvious. Hopefully I can shed some light on the options in this post.

Node or chrome?

nodeJust to be clear: node.js has nothing to do with chrome or chromium embedded. Chrome is a web-browser, a completely visual environment and ecosystem.

Node.js is the complete opposite. It is purely a shell based environment, meaning that it’s designed to run services and servers, with emphasis on the latter.

The only thing node.js and chrome have in common, is that they both use the V8 JavaScript runtime engine to load, JIT compile and execute scripts at high speed. Beyond that, they are utterly alien to each other.

Can node.js be embedded into a Delphi program?

Technically there is nothing stopping a C/C++ developer from compiling the node.js core system as C++ builder compatible .obj files; files that can then be linked into a Delphi application through references. But this also requires a bit of scaffolding, like adding support for malloc_, free_ and a few other procedures – so that your .obj files uses the same memory manager as your Delphi code. But until someone does just that and publish it, im afraid you are stuck with two options:

  • Use a library called Toby, that keeps node.js in a single DLL file. This is the most practical way if you insist on hosting your own version of node.js
  • Add node.js as a prerequisite and give users the option to locate the node.exe in your application’s preferences. This is the way I would go, because you really don’t want to force users to stick with your potentially outdated or buggy build.

So yes, you can use toby and just add the toby dll file to your program folder, but I have to strongly advice against that. There is no point setting yourself up for maintaining a whole separate programming language, just because you want JavaScript support.

“How many in your company can write high quality WebAssembly modules?”

If all you want to do is support JavaScript in your application, then I would much rather install Besen into Delphi. Besen is a JavaScript runtime engine written in Freepascal. It is fully compatible with Delphi, and follows the ECMA standard to the letter. So it is extremely compatible, fast and easy to use.

Like all Delphi components Besen is compiled into your application, so you have no dependencies to worry about.

Starting a node.js script

The easiest way to start a node.js script, is to simply shell-execute out of your Delphi application. This can be done as easily as:

ShellExecute(Handle, 'open', PChar('node.exe'), pchar('script.js'), nil, SW_SHOW);

This is more than enough if you just want to start a service, server or do some work that doesn’t require that you capture the result.

If you need to capture the result, the data that your node.js program emits on stdout, there is a nice component in the Jedi Component Library. Also plenty of examples online on how to do that.

If you need even further communication, you need to look for a shell-execute that support pipes. All node.js programs have something called a message-channel in the Javascript world. In reality though, this is just a named pipe that is automatically created when your script starts (with the same moniker as the PID [process identifier]).

If you opt for the latter you have a direct, full duplex message channel directly into your node.js application. You just have to agree with yourself on a protocol so that your Delphi code understands what node.js is saying, and visa versa.

UDP or TCP

If you don’t want to get your hands dirty with named pipes and rolling your own protocol, you can just use UDP to let your Delphi application communicate with your node.js process. UDP is practically without cost since its fundamental to all networking stacks, and in your case you will be shipping messages purely between processes on localhost. Meaning: packets are never sent on the network, but rather delegated between processes on the same machine.

In that case, I suggest you ship in the port you want your UDP server to listen on, so that your node.js service acts as the server. A simple command-line statement like:

node.exe myservice.js 8090

Inside node.js you can setup an UDP server with very little fuzz:


function setupServer(port) {
  var os = require("os");
  var dgram = require("dgram");
  var socket = dgram.createSocket("udp4");

  var MULTICAST_HOST = "224.0.0.236";
  var BROADCAST_HOST = "255.255.255.255";
  var ALL_PORT = 60540;
  var MULTICAST_TTL = 1; // Local network

  socket.bind(port);
  socket.on('listening', function() {
    socket.setMulticastLoopback(true);
    socket.setMulticastTTL(MULTICAST_TTL);
    socket.addMembership(multicastHost);
    if(broadcast) { socket.setBroadcast(true); }
  });
  socket.on('message', parseMessage);
}

function parseMessage(message, rinfo) {
try {
  var messageObject = JSON.parse(message);
  var eventType = messageObject.eventType;
  } catch(e) {
  }
}

Note: the code above assumes a JSON text message.

You can then use any Delphi UDP client to communicate with your node.js server, Indy is good, Synapse is a good library with less overhead – there are many options here.

Do I have to learn Javascript to use node.js?

If you download DWScript you can hook-up the JS-codegen library (see library folder in the DWScript repository), and use that to compile DWScript (object pascal) to kick-ass Javascript. This is the same compiler that was used in Smart Mobile Studio.

“Adding WebAssembly to your resume is going to be a hell of a lot more valuable in the years to come than C# or Java”

Another alternative is to use Freepascal, they have a pas2js project where you can compile ordinary object-pascal to javascript. Naturally there are a few things to keep in mind, both for DWScript and Freepascal – like avoiding pointers. But clean object pascal compiles just fine.

If JavaScript is not your cup of tea, or you simply don’t have time to learn the delicate nuances between the DOM (document object model, used by browsers) and the 100% package oriented approach deployed by node.js — then you can just straight up to webassembly.

RemObjects Software has a kick-ass webassembly compiler, perfect if you dont have the energy or time to learn JavaScript. As of writing this is the fastest and most powerful toolchain available. And I have tested them all.

WebAssembly, no Javascript needed

RO-Single-Gear-512You might remember Oxygene? It used to be shipped with Delphi as a way to target Microsoft CLR (common language runtime) and the .net framework.

Since then Oxygene and the RemObjects toolchain has evolved dramatically and is now capable of a lot more than CLR support.

  • You can compile to raw, llvm optimized machine code for 8 platforms
  • You can compile to CLR/.Net
  • You can compile to Java bytecodes
  • You can compile to WebAssembly!

WebAssembly is not Javascript, it’s important to underline that. WebAssembly was created especially for developers using traditional languages, so that traditional compilers can emit web friendly, binary code. Unlike Javascript, WebAssembly is a purely binary format. Just like Delphi generates machine-code that is linked into a final executable, WebAssembly is likewise compiled, linked and emitted in binary form.

If that sounds like a sales pitch, it’s not. It’s a matter of practicality.

  • WebAssembly is completely barren out of the box. The runtime environment, be it V8 for the browser or V8 for node.js, gives you nothing out of the box. You don’t even have WriteLn() to emit text.
  • Google expects compiler makers to provide their own RTL functions, from the fundamental to the advanced. The only thing V8 gives you, is a barebone way of referencing objects and functions on the other side, meaning the JS and DOM world. And that’s it.

So the reason i’m talking a lot about Oxygene and RemObjects Elements (Elements is the name of the compiler toolchain RemObjects offers), is because it ships with an RTL. So you are not forced to start on actual, literal assembly level.

studio

If you don’t want to study JavaScript, Oxygene and Elements from RemObjects is the solution

RemObjects also delivers a DelphiVCL compatibility framework. This is a clone of the Delphi VCL / Freepascal LCL. Since WebAssembly is still brand new, work is being done on this framework on a daily basis, with updates being issued all the time.

Note: The Delphi VCL framework is not just for WebAssembly. It represents a unified framework that can work anywhere. So if you switch from WebAssembly to say Android, you get the same result.

The most important part of the above, is actually not the visual stuff. I mean, having HTML5 visual controls is cool – but chances are you want to use a library like Sencha, SwiftUI or jQueryUI to compose your forms right? Which means you just want to interface with the widgets in the DOM to set and get values.

jQuery UI Bootstrap

You probably want to use a fancy UI library, like jQuery UI. This works perfectly with Elements because you can reference the controls from your WebAssembly module. You dont have to create TButton, TListbox etc manually

The more interesting stuff is actually the non-visual code you get access to. Hundreds of familiar classes from the VCL, painstakingly re-created, and usable from any of the 5 languages Elements supports.

You can check it out here: https://github.com/remobjects/DelphiRTL

Skipping JavaScript all together

I dont believe in single languages. Not any more. There was a time when all you needed was Delphi and a diploma and you were set to conquer the world. But those days are long gone, and a programmer needs to be flexible and have a well stocked toolbox.

At least try the alternatives before you settle on a phone

Knowing where you want to be is half the journey

The world really don’t need yet-another-c# developer. There are millions of C# developers in India alone. C# is just “so what?”. Which is also why C# jobs pays less than Delphi or node.js system service jobs.

What you want, is to learn the things others avoid. If JavaScript looks alien and you feel uneasy about the whole thing – that means you are growing as a developer. All new things are learned by venturing outside your comfort zone.

How many in your company can write high quality WebAssembly modules?

How many within one hour driving distance from your office or home are experts at WebAssembly? How many are capable of writing industrial scale, production ready system services for node.js that can scale from a single instance to 1000 instances in a large, clustered cloud environment?

Any idiot can pick up node.js and knock out a service, but with your background from Delphi or C++ builder you have a massive advantage. All those places that can throw an exception that JS devs usually ignore? As a Delphi or Oxygene developer you know better. And when you re-apply that experience under a different language, suddenly you can do stuff others cant. Which makes your skills valuable.

qtx

The Quartex Media Desktop have made even experienced node / web developers gasp. They are not used to writing custom-controls and large-scale systems, which is my advantage

So would you learn JavaScript or just skip to WebAssembly? Honestly? Learn a bit of both. You don’t have to be an expert in JavaScript to compliment WebAssembly. Just get a cheap book, like “Node.js for beginners” and “JavaScript the good parts” ($20 a piece) and that should be more than enough to cover the JS side of things.

Adding WebAssembly to your resume and having the material to prove you know your stuff, is going to be a hell of a lot more valuable in the years to come than C#, Java or Python. THAT I can guarantee you.

And, we have a wicked cool group on Facebook you can join too: Click here to visit RemObjects Developer.

 

Getting into Node.js from Delphi

July 1, 2019 Leave a comment

Delphi is one of the best development toolchains for Windows. I have been an avid fan of Delphi since it was first released, and before that – Turbo Pascal too. Delphi has a healthy following – and despite popular belief, Delphi scores quite well on the Tiobe Index.

As cool and efficient as Delphi might be, there are situations where native code wont work. Or at the very least, be less efficient than the alternatives. Delphi has a broad wingspan, from low-level assembler all the way to classes and generics. But JavaScript and emerging web technology is based on a completely different philosophy, one where native code is regarded as negative since it binds you to hardware.

Getting to grips with the whole JavaScript phenomenon, be it for mobile, embedded or back-end services, can be daunting if all you know is native code. But thankfully there are alternatives that can help you become productive quickly, something I will brush over in this post.

JavaScript without JavaScript

Before we dig into the tools of the trade, I want to cover alternative ways of enjoying the power of node.js and Javascript. Namely by using compilers that can convert code from a traditional language – and emit fully working JavaScript. There are a lot more options than you think:

qtx

Quartex Media Desktop is a complete environment written purely in JavaScript. Both Server, Cluster and front-end is pure JavaScript. A good example of what can be done.

  • Swift compiles for JavaScript, and Apple is doing some amazing things with the new and sexy SwiftUI tookit. If you know your way around Swift, you can compile for Javascript
  • Go can likewise be compiled to JS:
    • RemObjects Elements supports the Go language. Elements can target both native (llvm), .Net, Java and WebAssembly.
    • Go2Js
    • GopherJs
    • TARDISgo
  • C/C++ can be compiled to asm.js courtesy of EmScripten. It uses clang to first compile your code to llvm bitcode, and then it converts that into asm.js. You have probably seen games like Quake run in the browser? That was asm.js, a kind of precursor to WebAssembly.
  • NS Basic compiles for JavaScript, this is a Visual Basic 6 style environment with its own IDE even

For those coming straight from Delphi, there are a couple of options to pick from:

  • Freepascal (pas2js project)
  • DWScript compiles code to JavaScript, this is the same compiler that we used in Smart Pascal earlier
  • Oxygene, the next generation object-pascal from RemObjects compiles to WebAssembly. This is by far the best option of them all.
studio

I strongly urge you to have a look at Elements, here running in Visual Studio

JavaScript, Asm.js or WebAssembly?

Asm.js is by far the most misunderstood technology in the JavaScript ecosystem, so let me just cover that before we move on:

A few years back JavaScript gained support for memory buffers and typed arrays. This might not sound very exciting, but in terms of speed – the difference is tremendous. The default variable type in JavaScript is what Delphi developers know as Variant. It assumes the datatype of the values you assign to it. Needless to say, there is a lot of overhead when working with variants – so JavaScript suddenly getting proper typed arrays was a huge deal.

It was then discovered that JavaScript could manipulate these arrays and buffers at high speed, providing it only used a subset of the language. A subset that the JavaScript runtime could JIT compile more easily (turn into machine-code).

So what the EmScripten team did was to implement a bytecode based virtual-machine in Javascript, and then they compile C/C++ to bytecodes. I know, it’s a huge project, but the results speak for themselves — before WebAssembly, this was as fast as it got with JavaScript.

WebAssembly

WebAssembly is different from both vanilla JavaScript and Asm.js. First of all, it’s executed at high speed by the browser itself. Not like asm.js where these bytecodes were executed by JavaScript code.

water

Water is a fast, slick and platform independent IDE for Elements. The same IDE for OS X is called Fire. You can use RemObjects Elements from either Visual Studio or Water

Secondly, WebAssembly is completely JIT compiled by the browser or node.js when loading. It’s not like Asm.js where some parts are compiled, others are interpreted. WebAssembly runs at full speed and have nothing to do with traditional JavaScript. It’s actually a completely separate engine.

Out of all the options on the table, WebAssembly is the technology with the best performance.

Kits and strategies

The first thing you need to be clear about, is what you want to work with. The needs and requirements of a game developer will be very different from a system service developer.

Here are a couple of kits to think about:

  • Mobile developer
    • Implement your mobile applications using Oxygene, compiling for WebAssembly (Elements)
    • RemObjects Remoting SDK for client / server communication
    • Use Freepascal for vanilla JavaScript scaffolding when needed
  • Service developer
    • Implement libraries in Oxygene to benefit from the speed of WebAssembly
    • Use RemObjects Data Abstract to make data-access uniform and fast
    • Use Freepascal for boilerplate node.js logic
  • Desktop developer
    • For platform independent desktop applications, WebAssembly is the way to go. You will need some scaffolding (plain Javascript) to communicate with the application host  – but the 99.9% of your code will be better under WebAssembly.
    • Use Cordova / Phonegap to “bundle” your WebAssembly, HTML5 files and CSS styling into a single, final executable.

The most important part to think about when getting into JavaScript, is to look closely at the benefits and limitation of each technology.

WebAssembly is fast, wicked fast, and let’s you write code like you are used to from Delphi. Things like pointers etc are supported in Elements, which means ordinary code that use pointers will port over with ease. You are also not bound on hand-and-feet to a particular framework.

For example, EmScripten for C/C++ have almost nothing in terms of UI functionality. The visual part is a custom build of SDL (simple directmedia layer), which fakes the graphics onto an ordinary HTML5 canvas. This makes EmScripten a good candidate for porting games written in C/C++ to the web — but it’s less than optimal for writing serious applications.

Setting up the common tools

So far we have looked at a couple of alternatives for getting into the wonderful world of JavaScript in lieu of other languages. But what if you just want to get started with the typical tools JS developers use?

vscode

Visual Studio Code is a pretty amazing code-editor

The first “must have” is Visual Studio Code. This is actually a great example of what you can achieve with JavaScript, because the entire editor and program is written in JavaScript. But I want to stress that this editor is THE editor to get. The way you work with files in JS is very different from Delphi, C# and Java. JavaScript projects are often more fragmented, with less code in each file – organized by name.

typescript

TypeScript was invented by Anders Hejlsberg, who also made Delphi and C#

The next “must have” is without a doubt TypeScript. Personally im not too fond of TypeScript, but if ordinary JavaScript makes your head hurt and you want classes and ordinary inheritance, then TypeScript is a step up.

assemblyscriptNext on the list is AssemblyScript. This is a post-processor for TypeScript that converts your code into WebAssembly. It lacks much of the charm and elegance of Oxygene, but I suspect that has to do with old habits. When you have been reading object-pascal for 20 years, you feel more at home there.

nodeYou will also need to install node.js, which is the runtime engine for running JavaScript as services. Node.js is heavily optimized for writing server software, but it’s actually a brilliant way to write services that are multi-platform. Because Node.js delivers the same behavior regardless of underlying operating system.

phonegapAnd finally, since you definitely want to convert your JavaScript and/or WebAssembly into a stand-alone executable: you will need Adobe Phonegap.

Visual Studio

No matter if you want to enter JavaScript via Elements or something else, Visual Studio will save you a lot of time, especially if you plan on targeting Azure or Amazon services. Downloading and installing the community edition is a good idea, and you can use that while exploring your options.

dotnet-visual-studio

When it comes to writing system services, you also want to check out NPM, the node.js package manager. The JavaScript ecosystem is heavily package oriented – and npm gives you some 800.000 packages to play with free of charge.

Just to be clear, npm is a shell command you use to install or remove packages. NPM is also a online repository of said packages, where you can search and find what you need. Most packages are hosted on github, but when you install a package locally into your application folder – npm figures out dependencies etc. automatically for you.

Books, glorious books

41QSvp9fTcL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Last but not least, get some good books. Seriously, it will save you so much time and frustration. Amazon have tons of great books, be it vanilla JavaScript, TypeScript, Node.js — pick some good ones and take the time to consume the material.

And again, I strongly urge you to have a look at Elements when it comes to WebAssembly. WebAssembly is a harsh and barren canvas, and being able to use the Elements RTL is a huge boost.

But regardless of path you pick, you will always benefit from learning vanilla JavaScript.

 

Two new groups in the Developer family

July 1, 2019 2 comments

Delphi Developer is a group on Facebook that have been going strong for 12+ years. It was one of the first groups on Facebook, created the same week that Facebook allowed groups. With that group well established, it’s time to expand and clean up the feed.

RO-Single-Gear-512Last month I introduced a new group, RemObjects Developer, which is a group for developers that use RemObjects components, like the Remoting SDK, Data Abstract and/or Hydra – but more in particular, developers using Oxygene, C#, Swift, Java or Go via Elements (RemObjects compiler toolchain).

Two new groups

To further simplify syndication, and clean up the feeds (which so far has been a pot-purrey of many topics, dialects and products) an additional two groups is now in place:

Obviously there will be some overlapping. Since FPC and Delphi has much in common and are for the most part compatible, some news will be shared between those groups. But all in all this is to clean up the newsfeed which has so far been a mix and match of everything.

org

Simple overview of the groups

Node.js Developer is not meant to be purely about vanilla JavaScript. Node.js is ultimately a JavaScript runtime-engine. Which means you can use it to run or host WebAssembly libraries (as produced by Oxygene), or generate code via DWScript or Freepascal. You can think of it as a service-host if you like.

So if you are writing WebAssembly applications using Elements, then the node.js group will no doubt be interesting too. Same goes for DWScript users, Smart Pascal users and Freepascal users – providing web tech is what they like.

What is this Quartex Components?

It’s easier to manage multiple groups if you attach them to a parent-page. So if you wonder why all the groups says “by Quartex Components”, that is just a top-level page that helps me deal with with syndication. For some reason Facebook’s API only works for pages, not groups. So it’s impossible to auto-import news (for example) without a page.

The name, “Quartex Components” is ultimately the name of my personal company. I used to produce security components for Delphi, but decided to open-source those for the community.

So Quartex Components is just an organizational element.

Generic protect for FPC/Lazarus

June 30, 2019 Leave a comment

Freepascal is not frequently mentioned on my blog. I have written about it from time to time, not always in a positive light though. Just to be clear, FPC (the compiler) is fantastic; it was one particular fork of Lazarus I had issues with, involving a license violation.

On the whole, freepascal and Lazarus is capable of great things. There are a few quirks here and there (if not oddities) that prevents mass adoption (the excessive use of include-files to “fake” partial classes being one), but as object-pascal compilers go, Freepascal is a battle-hardened, production ready system.

It’s been Linux in particular that I have used Freepascal on. In 2015 Hydro Oil wanted to move their back-end from Windows to Linux, and I spent a few months converting windows-only services into Linux daemons.

Today I find myself converting parts of the toolkit I came up with to Oxygene, but that’s a post for another day.

Generic protect

If you work a lot with multithreaded code, the unit im posting here might come in handy. Long story short: sharing composite objects between threads and the main process, always means extra scaffolding. You have to make sure you don’t access the list (or it’s elements) at the same time as another thread for example. To ensure this you can either use a critical-section, or you can deliver the data with a synchronized call. This is more or less universal for all languages, no matter if you are using Oxygene, C/C++, C# or Delphi.

When this unit came into being, I was doing quite elaborate classes with a lot of lists. These classes could not share ancestor, or I could have gotten away with just one locking mechanism. Instead I had to implement the same boilerplate code over and over again.

The unit below makes insulating (or protecting) classes easier. It essentially envelopes whatever class-instance you feed it, and returns the proxy object. Whenever you want to access your instance, you have to unlock it first or use a synchronizer (see below).

Works in both Freepascal and Delphi

The unit works for both Delphi and Freepascal, but there is one little difference. For some reason Freepascal does not support anonymous procedures, so we compensate and use inline-procedures instead. While not a huge deal, I really hope the FPC team add anonymous procedures, it makes life a lot easier for generics based code. Async programming without anonymous procedures is highly impractical too.

So if you are in Delphi you can write:

var
 lValue: TProtectedValue;
 lValue.Synchronize( procedure (var Value: integer)
 begin
   Value := Value * 12;
 end);

But under Freepascal you must resort to:

var
 lValue: TProtectedValue;

procedure _UpdateValue(var Data: integer);
begin
 Data := Data * 12;
end;

begin
  lValue.Synchronize(@_UpdateValue);
end;

On small examples like these, the benefit of this style of coding might be lost; but if you suddenly have 40-50 lists that needs to be shared between 100-200 active threads, it will be a time saver!

You can also use it on intrinsic datatypes:

lazarus

OK, here we go:

unit safeobjects;

// 	SafeObjects
//	==========================================================================
//	Written by Jon-Lennart Aasenden
//	Copyright Quartex Components LTD, all rights reserved
//
//	This unit is a part of the QTX Patreon Library
//
//	NOTES ABOUT FREEPASCAL:
//	=======================
//	Freepascal does not allow anonymous procedures, which means we must
//	resort to inline procedures instead:
//
// 	Where we in Delphi could write the following for an atomic,
//	thread safe alteration:
//
// var
// 	LValue: TProtectedValue;
//
//	LValue.Synchronize( procedure (var Value: integer)
//	begin
//		Value := Value * 12;
//	end);
//
//	Freepascal demands that we use an inline procedure instead, which
//  is more or less the same code, just organized slightly differently.
//
// var
// 	LValue: TProtectedValue;
//
//  procedure _UpdateValue(var Data: integer);
//  begin
//  	Data := Data * 12;
//  end;
//
// begin
//	LValue.Synchronize(@_UpdateValue);
// end;
//
//
//
//

{$mode DELPHI}
{$H+}

interface

uses
  {$IFDEF FPC}
  SysUtils,
  Classes,
  SyncObjs,
  Generics.Collections;
	{$ELSE}
  System.SysUtils,
  System.Classes,
  System.SyncObjs,
  System.Generics.Collections;
  {$ENDIF}

type

  {$DEFINE INHERIT_FROM_CRITICALSECTION}

  TProtectedValueAccessRights = set of (lvRead, lvWrite);

  EProtectedValue = class(exception);
  EProtectedObject = class(exception);

  (* Thread safe intrinsic datatype container.
     When sharing values between processes, use this class
     to make read/write access safe and protected. *)

  {$IFDEF INHERIT_FROM_CRITICALSECTION}
  TProtectedValue = class(TCriticalSection)
  {$ELSE}
  TProtectedValue = class(TObject)
  {$ENDIF}
  strict private
    {$IFNDEF INHERIT_FROM_CRITICALSECTION}
    FLock: TCriticalSection;
    {$ENDIF}
    FData: T;
    FOptions: TProtectedValueAccessRights;
  strict protected
    function GetValue: T;virtual;
    procedure SetValue(Value: T);virtual;
    function GetAccessRights: TProtectedValueAccessRights;
    procedure SetAccessRights(Rights: TProtectedValueAccessRights);
  public
    type
  		{$IFDEF FPC}
      TProtectedValueEntry = procedure (var Data: T);
  		{$ELSE}
      TProtectedValueEntry = reference to procedure (var Data: T);
      {$ENDIF}
  public
    constructor Create(Value: T); overload; virtual;
    constructor Create(Value: T; const Access: TProtectedValueAccessRights); overload; virtual;
    constructor Create(const Access: TProtectedValueAccessRights); overload; virtual;
    destructor Destroy;override;

    {$IFNDEF INHERIT_FROM_CRITICALSECTION}
    procedure Enter;
    procedure Leave;
    {$ENDIF}
    procedure Synchronize(const Entry: TProtectedValueEntry);

    property AccessRights: TProtectedValueAccessRights read GetAccessRights;
    property Value: T read GetValue write SetValue;
  end;

  (* Thread safe object container.
     NOTE #1: This object container **CREATES** the instance and maintains it!
              Use Edit() to execute a protected block of code with access
              to the object.

     Note #2: SetValue() does not overwrite the object reference, but
              attempts to perform TPersistent.Assign(). If the instance
              does not inherit from TPersistent an exception is thrown. *)
  TProtectedObject = class(TObject)
  strict private
    FData:      T;
    FLock:      TCriticalSection;
    FOptions:   TProtectedValueAccessRights;
  strict protected
    function    GetValue: T;virtual;
    procedure   SetValue(Value: T);virtual;
    function    GetAccessRights: TProtectedValueAccessRights;
    procedure   SetAccessRights(Rights: TProtectedValueAccessRights);
  public
    type
			{$IFDEF FPC}
      TProtectedObjectEntry = procedure (const Data: T);
	    {$ELSE}
      TProtectedObjectEntry = reference to procedure (const Data: T);
      {$ENDIF}
  public
    property    Value: T read GetValue write SetValue;
    property    AccessRights: TProtectedValueAccessRights read GetAccessRights;

    function    Lock: T;
    procedure   Unlock;
    procedure   Synchronize(const Entry: TProtectedObjectEntry);

    Constructor Create(const AOptions: TProtectedValueAccessRights = [lvRead,lvWrite]); virtual;
    Destructor  Destroy; override;
  end;

  (* TProtectedObjectList:
     This is a thread-safe object list implementation.
     It works more or less like TThreadList, except it deals with objects *)
  TProtectedObjectList = class(TInterfacedPersistent)
  strict private
    FObjects: TObjectList;
    FLock: TCriticalSection;
  strict protected
    function GetEmpty: boolean;virtual;
    function GetCount: integer;virtual;

    (* QueryObject Proxy: TInterfacedPersistent allows us to
       act as a proxy for QueryInterface/GetInterface. Override
       and provide another child instance here to expose
       interfaces from that instread *)
  protected
    function GetOwner: TPersistent;override;

  public
    type
      {$IFDEF FPC}
      TProtectedObjectListProc = procedure (Item: TObject; var Cancel: boolean);
      {$ELSE}
      TProtectedObjectListProc = reference to procedure (Item: TObject; var Cancel: boolean);
      {$ENDIF}
  public
    constructor Create(OwnsObjects: Boolean = true); virtual;
    destructor  Destroy; override;

    function    Contains(Instance: TObject): boolean; virtual;
    function    Enter: TObjectList; virtual;
    Procedure   Leave; virtual;
    Procedure   Clear; virtual;

    procedure   ForEach(const CB: TProtectedObjectListProc); virtual;

    Property    Count: integer read GetCount;
    Property    Empty: boolean read GetEmpty;
  end;

implementation

//############################################################################
//  TProtectedObjectList
//############################################################################

constructor TProtectedObjectList.Create(OwnsObjects: Boolean = True);
begin
  inherited Create;
  FObjects := TObjectList.Create(OwnsObjects);
  FLock := TCriticalSection.Create;
end;

destructor TProtectedObjectList.Destroy;
begin
  FLock.Enter;
  FObjects.Free;
  FLock.Free;
  inherited;
end;

procedure TProtectedObjectList.Clear;
begin
  FLock.Enter;
  try
    FObjects.Clear;
  finally
    FLock.Leave;
  end;
end;

function TProtectedObjectList.GetOwner: TPersistent;
begin
  result := NIL;
end;

procedure TProtectedObjectList.ForEach(const CB: TProtectedObjectListProc);
var
  LItem:  TObject;
  LCancel:  Boolean;
begin
	LCancel := false;
  if assigned(CB) then
  begin
    FLock.Enter;
    try
    	{$HINTS OFF}
      for LItem in FObjects do
      begin
        LCancel := false;
        CB(LItem, LCancel);
        if LCancel then
        	break;
      end;
      {$HINTS ON}
    finally
      FLock.Leave;
    end;
  end;
end;

function TProtectedObjectList.Contains(Instance: TObject): boolean;
begin
  result := false;
  if assigned(Instance) then
  begin
    FLock.Enter;
    try
      result := FObjects.Contains(Instance);
    finally
      FLock.Leave;
    end;
  end;
end;

function TProtectedObjectList.GetCount: integer;
begin
  FLock.Enter;
  try
    result :=FObjects.Count;
  finally
    FLock.Leave;
  end;
end;

function TProtectedObjectList.GetEmpty: Boolean;
begin
  FLock.Enter;
  try
    result := FObjects.Count<1;
  finally
    FLock.Leave;
  end;
end;

function TProtectedObjectList.Enter: TObjectList;
begin
  FLock.Enter;
  result := FObjects;
end;

procedure TProtectedObjectList.Leave;
begin
  FLock.Leave;
end;

//############################################################################
//  TProtectedObject
//############################################################################

constructor TProtectedObject.Create(const AOptions: TProtectedValueAccessRights = [lvRead, lvWrite]);
begin
  inherited Create;
  FLock := TCriticalSection.Create;
  FLock.Enter();
  try
  	FOptions := AOptions;
  	FData := T.Create;
  finally
    FLock.Leave();
  end;
end;

destructor TProtectedObject.Destroy;
begin
	FData.free;
  FLock.Free;
  inherited;
end;

function TProtectedObject.GetAccessRights: TProtectedValueAccessRights;
begin
  FLock.Enter;
  try
    result := FOptions;
  finally
    FLock.Leave;
  end;
end;

procedure TProtectedObject.SetAccessRights(Rights: TProtectedValueAccessRights);
begin
  FLock.Enter;
  try
    FOptions := Rights;
  finally
    FLock.Leave;
  end;
end;

function TProtectedObject.Lock: T;
begin
  FLock.Enter;
  result := FData;
end;

procedure TProtectedObject.Unlock;
begin
  FLock.Leave;
end;

procedure TProtectedObject.Synchronize(const Entry: TProtectedObjectEntry);
begin
  if assigned(Entry) then
  begin
    FLock.Enter;
    try
      Entry(FData);
    finally
      FLock.Leave;
    end;
  end;
end;

function TProtectedObject.GetValue: T;
begin
  FLock.Enter;
  try
    if (lvRead in FOptions) then
    	result := FData
  	else
    	raise EProtectedObject.CreateFmt('%s:Read not allowed error',[classname]);
  finally
    FLock.Leave;
  end;
end;

procedure TProtectedObject.SetValue(Value: T);
begin
  FLock.Enter;
  try
    if (lvWrite in FOptions) then
    begin
      if (TObject(FData) is TPersistent)
      or (TObject(FData).InheritsFrom(TPersistent)) then
      	TPersistent(FData).Assign(TPersistent(Value))
    	else
      	raise EProtectedObject.CreateFmt
        	('Locked object assign failed, %s does not inherit from %s',
        	[TObject(FData).ClassName,'TPersistent']);

    end else
    raise EProtectedObject.CreateFmt('%s:Write not allowed error',[classname]);
  finally
    FLock.Leave;
  end;
end;

//############################################################################
//  TProtectedValue
//############################################################################

Constructor TProtectedValue.Create(const Access: TProtectedValueAccessRights);
begin
  inherited Create;
  {$IFNDEF INHERIT_FROM_CRITICALSECTION}
  FLock := TCriticalSection.Create;
  {$ENDIF}
  FOptions := Access;
end;

constructor TProtectedValue.Create(Value: T);
begin
  inherited Create;
  {$IFNDEF INHERIT_FROM_CRITICALSECTION}
  FLock := TCriticalSection.Create;
  {$ENDIF}
  FOptions := [lvRead, lvWrite];
  FData := Value;
end;

constructor TProtectedValue.Create(Value: T; const Access: TProtectedValueAccessRights);
begin
  inherited Create;
  {$IFNDEF INHERIT_FROM_CRITICALSECTION}
  FLock := TCriticalSection.Create;
  {$ENDIF}
  FOptions := Access;
  FData := Value;
end;

Destructor TProtectedValue.Destroy;
begin
  {$IFNDEF INHERIT_FROM_CRITICALSECTION}
  FLock.Free;
  {$ENDIF}
  inherited;
end;

function TProtectedValue.GetAccessRights: TProtectedValueAccessRights;
begin
  Enter();
  try
    result := FOptions;
  finally
    Leave();
  end;
end;

procedure TProtectedValue.SetAccessRights(Rights: TProtectedValueAccessRights);
begin
  Enter();
  try
    FOptions := Rights;
  finally
    Leave();
  end;
end;

{$IFNDEF INHERIT_FROM_CRITICALSECTION}
procedure TProtectedValue.Enter;
begin
  FLock.Enter;
end;

procedure TProtectedValue.Leave;
begin
  FLock.Leave;
end;
{$ENDIF}

procedure TProtectedValue.Synchronize(const Entry: TProtectedValueEntry);
begin
  if assigned(Entry) then
  Begin
    Enter();
    try
      Entry(FData);
    finally
      Leave();
    end;
  end;
end;

function TProtectedValue.GetValue: T;
begin
  Enter();
  try
    if (lvRead in FOptions) then
    	result := FData
    else
    	raise EProtectedValue.CreateFmt('%s: Read not allowed error', [Classname]);
  finally
    Leave();
  end;
end;

procedure TProtectedValue.SetValue(Value: T);
begin
  Enter();
  try
    if (lvWrite in FOptions) then
    	FData:=Value
    else
    	raise EProtectedValue.CreateFmt('%s: Write not allowed error', [Classname]);
  finally
    Leave();
  end;
end;

end.

Hydra now supports Freepascal and Java

June 15, 2019 2 comments

In case you guys missed it, RemObjects Hydra 6.2 now supports FreePascal!

This means that you can now use forms and units from .net and Java from your Freepascal applications – and (drumroll) also mix and match between Delphi, .net, Java and FPC modules! So if you see something cool that Freepascal lacks, just slap it in a Hydra module and you can use it across language barriers.

I have used Hydra for years with Delphi, and being able to use .net forms and components in Delphi is pretty awesome. It’s also a great framework for building modular applications that are easier to manage.

64296152_10156282425590906_705072396930908160_n

Being able to tap into Freepascal is a great feature. Or the other way around, with Freepascal showing forms from Delphi, .net or Java.

For example, if you are moving to Freepascal, you can isolate the forms or controls that are not available under Freepascal in a Hydra module, and voila – you can gradually migrate.

If you are moving to Oxygene Pascal the same applies, you can implement the immediate logic under .net, and then import and use the parts that can’t easily be ported (or that you want to wait with).

The best of four worlds — You gotta love that!

Check out Hydra here:

https://hydra.remobjects.com/hydra/whatsnew/default.aspx