Home > Delphi, JavaScript, Linux, Object Pascal, Smart Mobile Studio > VMWare: A Delphi developers best friend

VMWare: A Delphi developers best friend

Full disclosure: I am not affiliated with any particular virtualization vendor of any sorts. The reason I picked VMWare was because their product was faster when I compared the various solutions. So feel free to replace the word VMWare with whatever virtualization software suits your needs.

On Delphi Developer we get new members and questions about Delphi and C++ builder every day. It’s grown into an awesome community where we help each other, do business, find jobs and even become personal friends.

A part of what we do in our community, is to tip each other about cool stuff. It doesn’t have to be directly bound to Delphi or code either; people have posted open source graphic programs, video editing, database designers – as long as its open source or freeware its a great thing (we have a strict policy of no piracy or illegal copying).

Today we got talking about VMWare and how its a great time saver. So here goes:

Virtualization

Virtualization is, simply put, a form of emulation. Back in the mid 90s emulators became hugely popular because for the first time in history – we had CPU’s powerful enough to emulate other computers at full speed. This was radical because up until that point, you needed special hardware to do that. You had also been limited to emulating legacy systems with no practical business value.

vmware

VmWare Workstation is an amazing piece of engineering

Emulation has always been there, even back in the 80s with 16 bit computers. But while it was technically possible, it was more a curiosity than something an office environment would benefit from (unless you used expensive compute boards). We had to wait until the late 90s to see commercial-grade x86 emulation hitting the market, with Virtuozzo releasing Parallels in 1997 and VMWare showing up around 1998. Both of these companies grew out of the data-center culture and academia.

It’s also worth noting that modern CPU’s now support virtualization on  hardware level, so when you are “virtualizing” Windows the machine code is not interpreted or JIT compiled – it runs on the same CPU as your real system.

Why does it matter

Virtualization is not just for data-centers and server-farms, it’s also for desktop use. My personal choice was VMWare because I felt their product performed better than the others. But in all fairness it’s been a few years since I compared between systems, so that might be different today.

53145702_10156048129355906_2019146241329332224_o

A screengrab of my desktop, here showing 3 virtual machines running. I have 64 gigabyte memory and these 3 virtual machines consume around 24 gigabytes and uses 17% of the Intel i7 CPU power during compile. It hardly registers on the CPU stats when idle.

VMWare Workstation is a desktop application available for Windows, Linux and OS X. And it allows me to create virtual machines, or “emulations” if you like. The result is that I can run multiple instances of Windows on a single PC. The virtual machines are all sandbox in large hard-disk files, and you have to install Windows or Linux into these virtual systems.

The bonus though is fantastic. Once you have installed an operating-system, you can copy it, move it, do partial cloning (only changes are isolated in new sandboxes) and much, much more. The cloning functionality is incredibly powerful, especially for a developer.

It also gives you something called snap-shot support. A snapshot is, like the word hints to, a copy of whatever state your virtual-machine is in at that point in time. This is a wonderful feature if you remember to use it properly. I try to take snapshots before I install anything, be it larger systems like Delphi, or just utility applications I download. Should something go wrong with the tools your work depends on — you can just roll back to a previous snapshot (!)

A great time saver

Updates to development tools are always awesome, but there are times when things can go wrong. But if you remember to take a snapshot before you install a program, or before you install a component package — should something go wrong, then rolling back to a clean point is reduced to a mouse click.

I mean, imagine you update your development tools right? Suddenly you realize that a component package your software depends on doesn’t work. If you have installed your devtools directly on the metal, you suddenly have a lot of time-consuming work to do:

  • Re-install your older devtools
  • Re-install your components and fix broken paths

That wont be a problem if you only have 2-3 packages, but I have hundreds of components install on my rig. Just getting my components working can take almost a full work-day, and I’m not exaggerating (!).

With VMWare, I just roll back to when all was fine, and go about my work like nothing happened.

I made a quick, slapdash video to demonstrate how easy VmWare makes my Delphi and JS development. If you are not using virtualization I hope this video at least makes it a bit clearer why so many do.

vmware_youtube

Click the image to watch the video on YouTube

  1. dummzeuch
    March 3, 2019 at 12:56 pm

    Reblogged this on twm's blog and commented:
    While I agree with Jon in principle, using virtual machines can also add overhead that you don’t want to have:
    * Virtual Machines tend to grow and grow and grow, until they become nearly unmanageable.
    * Backups will sooner or later grow beyond your available space or the time you want to spend on them.
    * You need to keep track of what a snapshot was about.
    * Snapshots, again add to the growth of Virtual Machines. And again, there is the backup issue.

    And last but not least: In my line of work, I often need access to custom hardware, e.g. serial ports, CAN bus adapters, cameras … This cannot be done with any of the virtualization environments I know. Some support serial ports, but that’s about it.

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