Home > Amiga, CSS, Delphi, JavaScript, nodeJS, Object Pascal, OP4JS, Raspberry PI, Smart Mobile Studio > Smart Pascal: Busting browser storage limits

Smart Pascal: Busting browser storage limits

Sessionstorage is the name for a browser’s in-memory only storage. Meaning that it’s essentially a ram-disk that is just deleted when you navigate away from the website or close the browser.

Sessionstorage has also been deprecated, so you should avoid using it and go for Localstorage, or just use a raw, untyped uint8 array instead.

Or should you?

Ensuring 64 megabytes minimum

Browsers do not behave identically across devices. Try to get a concurrent reading of something as simple as drawing sprites, and you will quickly notice that even the same device families (Android, iOS and Microsoft) can behave differently between versions – and even builds (revisions).

On embedded systems or thin clients with very little memory, allocating large chunks ot uint8 arrays is not going to work. One of my test thin-client machines has only 512 megabyte ram – and it would throw an exception if I tried to allocate more than 20 megabyte of continuous memory (again, as an array of uint8 bytes).

Using the dark side of the force

Screenshot

Offline means the system boots from a local cache disk

While testing Smart code on this little device, I noticed that quite large images loaded just fine. So where I was not allowed to allocate more than 20 megabytes, the browser would happily load in pictures taking up over 50 megabyte of pixel data?

It then struck me that the maximum limit of a picture, which is enforced by the DIB Api (at least on Windows desktop and embedded), is 4000 x 4000 pixels. Since each pixel is 32 bits (4 bytes, RGBA) that my friend is 64 megabytes right there!

I created a new class that inherits from the virtual-filesystem that Smart Pascal uses, created an off-screen image object in the constructor – and then made a simple but effective “bytes to scan line” calculation routine. So whenever the need for more data grew, it would first grow the picture so it could hold the data (and shrink it again) on demand.

Humble but meaningful

Now 64 megabytes might not seem like much in our day and age, but if you are on holiday and want to connect to your home NAS – 64 megabytes of available ram makes a huge difference. Remember that localstorage only allows between 5 and 10 megabytes.

I should mention that using an image as a buffer makes little sense on a full Windows PC, a Mac or a Linux box. These system will page memory to disk and you will most likely never encounter the 20 megabyte barrier I experienced on this low-end Dell thin client device. But considering that hotels, motels and b&b often have thin clients setup for their customers (read: you) – The Smart desktop has to take height for it.

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: